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Ian Conrey
Working with Lead Doors
Ian Conrey

My family and I recently moved into a home built in 1945. It has lots of character (original door hardware, etc.) but it also has a lot of lead. I spent about $3200 professionally abating and encapsulating the lead so that it would be safe for my family (We have an 8 year old son and a 7 month old daughter). So on the safe level it is fine. I would however like to do some work my self. I'd like to restore the door hardware and I would also like to redo the doors leading outside. I did not have the pros work on those doors (they only did the interior doors) simply because they were already painted over with non-lead. This however is only a temporary fix. Should I have the professionals come back and do this or can I? I have read countless articles and pamphlets on working safely with lead. I've read about soaking the hardware in a crock pot, only wet sanding wood, etc. I guess my question is, what can I safely do with children living in the home? Is simply taking the door hardware off going to release too much lead in the air? Should I have it all professionally done or can I do some of it myself? Anyone with this kind of experience please let me know.

*I tried to upload pictures from my computer but I kept getting an error saying it was an invalid file type. They are all .jpg so I am not sure why it is doing that. Either way, here is a link to the pictures...

Door Hardware that I would like to restore
http://s1227.photobucket.com/user/ianconrey/media/CAM00682_zpsbjtkgzlh.jpg.html
http://s1227.photobucket.com/user/ianconrey/media/CAM00683_zps5ja0is38.jpg.html
http://s1227.photobucket.com/user/ianconrey/media/CAM00684_zpse9ls8saa.jpg.html

Backdoor with underlying cracking lead. (This was not done by the pro's. I figured I would get it done later, or maybe I could do it myself. Or maybe it is fine? Not sure if I should sand, replace the door, or just let it be)
http://s1227.photobucket.com/user/ianconrey/media/CAM00685_zpsa9x5zw3f.jpg.html
http://s1227.photobucket.com/user/ianconrey/media/CAM00686_zpsowjw2mcg.jpg.html

Backdoor also needs to be planed so it doesn't rub against the frame
http://s1227.photobucket.com/user/ianconrey/media/CAM00687_zpsbdo4dtdn.jpg.html

Thank you1

Jack
Re: Working with Lead Doors
Jack

Chemical stripping and proper disposal should be fine. Personally, I think lead abatement is more about money than safety. Unless you kids are eating the lead chips I don't see any real problem. JMHO.

Jack

ed21
Re: Working with Lead Doors
ed21

Lead containing dust from sanding could definitely be a problem with small children since they live on the floor and put everything in their mouths.
Lead doesn't get airborn as much as it settles on the floor. I don't see why you couldn't do hardware. I would be leary of doing large objects like doors unless they can be done remotely especially if I had small children that crawl.
Kids eat and put anything in their mouths. BTW lead paint chips are supposed to be sweet.

Ian Conrey
Re: Working with Lead Doors
Ian Conrey

Thanks for the replies. I guess I am a little paranoid. We have a HEPA filter vacuum, lead wipes, and I have a gallon of lead encapsulate paint coming in. We use the vacuum and wipes often. I just don't want to jeopardize the health of my children because of negligence. I will likely replace the back door instead of working on it. What about planning the edge of the doors? There is lead on them, so should I just spray those with some water before I plane and lay down some plastic or should I take them outside? I certainly want to do something because they are rubbing against the frame.

Jack
Re: Working with Lead Doors
Jack

Take them out side, use a chemical stripper that way there is no dust.

Jack

HandyAndyInMtAiry
Re: Working with Lead Doors
HandyAndyInMtAiry

Ian
I believe that you are. Like posted, unless you are eating it, or the dust, there are no worries. We have an old Victorian house that everything has lead paint, including the outside of the house. It was not painted after replacing all the clap boards, so I know there is lead paint under there. Also, we removed all the old carpet and found glue and paint going up the stair treads. We have stripped most of the wood that is in the house, since it was all covered with paint. We also removed the carpet from the three downstairs baths that were covered in carpet and glue using Soy-Gel. It did not hurt the original hexagon tile. I found a great product called "Soy-Gel" It has a great "Lead-out" item in the gel. I use it to strip everything now. I was able to strip all of the woodwork in the house without any damage, without a mask, much less a respirator. I used only gloves for ease of cleanup. I got it on my hands, my clothes, my skin, and nothing happened. The gel washed easily out of my clothing. Clean up is with warm soap and water. I decided to use a citrus based wood cleaner to soak up the gel. It is very simple to use, and works without harm. We love this stuff so much we bought all the store has in stock. You may purchase it thru their website.

We do not work for the company, but just wanted to pass along a much more simple, and time saving way to clean off varnish, paint, glue and who knows what all uses was on the steps and bathroom floors. We now use it first for stubborn stains in almost everything. Once you soak up the gel after, simply toss it in the trash. It is now that safe to dispose of. With Soy-Gel, there is no sanding, unless you want a very smooth surface after you remove the paint. Which I did to all the stairs. I used a FesTool sander, since it has a containment for easy cleanup. If you have ever used a sander indoors, you will now use a FesTool sander. That reason, and it has changeable heads. One round and triangle. Talk about easy to use on stairs and intricate woodwork.

I highly recommend Soy-Gel to anyone that is trying to strip old wood. I even recommend this to Nicole Curtis to remove paint, oil and varnish from door hardware after seeing her struggle with trying to remove paint from door hinges.

Handy Andy In Mt Airy

Ian Conrey
Re: Working with Lead Doors
Ian Conrey

Thank you for the reply! I will look into the Soy Gel. I did have another question. The gallon of white Leadblock encapsulate paint came in and it says to not use on impact areas. This poses a little problem since that is exactly what I need it for. Even if I strip the paint the lead has soaked into the wood and I would rather use this than just normal paint of primer. Anyone use Lead Block? Can I realistically use this on the impact areas or should I just use regular paint?

Also, if I want to plane the edge of a door so it doesn't rub against the frame do I need to strip it first or can I just spray it with water to minimize dust particles. I'll take the door outside if I need to but I'd rather do it in the house. I have never worked with lead before so forgive all of the questions!

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