Home>Discussions>INTERIORS>Molding & Carpentry>raised panels on both sides of a door?
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cruiser680
raised panels on both sides of a door?

I'm sketching out the doors, about a dozen, to make for our 1911 bungalow. Dear Wife favors a raised panel which is fine except for interior doors, say a bedroom to a hallway, should panels be raised on both sides? I think so but are there any tricks to layout or construction I'm missing?

A. Spruce
Re: raised panels on both sides of a door?

Yes, the raised panel should be on both sides of the door. As for tricks, that would depend on the equipment you have. If you've got a shaper or a high powered router and table, then you can get a set of door bits that will put the profile on the rails and styles of the door as well as the panel itself (separate bits, separate processes ). If you do not have the aforementioned machines, then you can still do this, but it will be a bit more setup and thought to your processes.

What do you have for a wood shop and abilities?

JLMCDANIEL
Re: raised panels on both sides of a door?

Raised panels can also be done on a table saw but requires building a jig. If you do have a router table it does require a different bit than those for raised pane cabinet doors and the panels are generally significantly thiner. Mortise and tenon joinery is also a must to keep the doors from sagging.
Jack

cruiser680
Re: raised panels on both sides of a door?

Thanks for answering. I have a pretty hefty router and a table. I was going to use floating oak tenons in the white oak frames. Didn't think the panels (maple) had to be the same thickness as the frame (1 3/8) but with two raised surfaces I'd like there to be enough left to make a nice fit (unglued) into the grooves on the stiles.

Cruiser

A. Spruce
Re: raised panels on both sides of a door?
cruiser680 wrote:

Thanks for answering. I have a pretty hefty router and a table. I was going to use floating oak tenons in the white oak frames. Didn't think the panels (maple) had to be the same thickness as the frame (1 3/8) but with two raised surfaces I'd like there to be enough left to make a nice fit (unglued) into the grooves on the stiles.

Cruiser

The panels don't have to be the same thickness as the door rails and stiles, but be forewarned that if they're not it may make the door look a little strange.

I would still recommend buying a door cutter set of router bits rather than hand milling the mortise and tenons and edge profiles on the rails and stiles. Short of that, the mortise and tenon work can be done at the tablesaw, the edge profile work done at the router table with an ogee, cove, or round over bit of your choosing.

On the raised panel doors that I've repaired, the rails and stiles are also doweled to give extra strength to the joints. If you go this route, then drill your mating dowel holes before any of the other work. When you cut your rails (horizontal pieces ) be sure length for the tenon tongue is accounted for.

cruiser680
Re: raised panels on both sides of a door?

Never a problem buying new toys when Madame is getting a project out of it, that's our deal. Door set of router bits, check. I wasn't intending on doing any handwork. Dado an inch deep groove the length of each stile and the ends of the rails on the table saw. The floating tenon is a milled piece of oak 3/4 in. thick, 2 in. wide, and just shy of the width of the top, lock or bottom rail.

Cruiser

JLMCDANIEL
Re: raised panels on both sides of a door?

All the "raised" panels in the doors in my house are only about ½" thick. ¼" at edge and 1/8" raise on each side, doors are 1 3/8" thick.
Jack

A. Spruce
Re: raised panels on both sides of a door?
cruiser680 wrote:

Never a problem buying new toys when Madame is getting a project out of it, that's our deal. Door set of router bits, check. I wasn't intending on doing any handwork. Dado an inch deep groove the length of each stile and the ends of the rails on the table saw. The floating tenon is a milled piece of oak 3/4 in. thick, 2 in. wide, and just shy of the width of the top, lock or bottom rail.

Cruiser

Before you dive head first into running all those dados, I'd suggest building a mock up first to determine if your plan will work as expected. The thing that's jumping off the page at me at the moment is the size of the dado and it being too large for the panels you have in mind. I could be wrong, but thought it worth mentioning. Also, keep in mind that these doors are going to be heavy, so the strength of the joints are critically important to prevent them from breaking under the weight of the door.

cruiser680
Re: raised panels on both sides of a door?

Thanks Jack.
That's what we noted in the few doors the prior owner left in the house. Certainly will same on weight and expensive material. Most of the doors and light fixtures were stripped out as they neared foreclosure I'm guessing.

Cruiser

JLMCDANIEL
Re: raised panels on both sides of a door?
cruiser680 wrote:

Thanks Jack.
That's what we noted in the few doors the prior owner left in the house. Certainly will same on weight and expensive material. Most of the doors and light fixtures were stripped out as they neared foreclosure I'm guessing.

Cruiser

Around here we've even had them strip out plumbing and wiring.
Jack

goldhiller
Re: raised panels on both sides of a door?
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Around here we've even had them strip out plumbing and wiring.
Jack

Real nice........not.

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