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csisia
Gap Under Interior French Doors

I just finished up a flooring project in my 1922 Craftsman - removed carpet, vinyl tile (w/ LOTS of cutback adhesive) and sanded refinished the floors. I am very happy with how the floors came out. I was a little suprised, however, with how HUGE the gap under my french doors was when I re-hung them. The gap between the floor and the bottom of the door is around 1-1/2" (I can fit my foot underneath).

Looking for some ideas to minimize that gap. All I can think of is a) build up the floor with a transition, then add some kind of sweep to the bottom of the doors or, b) add a trim piece to the faces of the doors. I personally don't think either option will look that good, but I know that gap will drive me mad. These are interior doors between my dining room and den, so it's purely an esthetic issue.

Any ideas/opinions are welcome!

Thanks.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Gap Under Interior French Doors

Best option would be to remove the doors, the trim, and the door frame, cut down the frame and trim and reinstall. It could leave a small area above the door to repair.

Jack

dcalabro
Re: Gap Under Interior French Doors

If the french doors are painted wood, you could simply add some wood to the bottom of each door. This could easily be blended in for a smooth finish and repainted. In any other case you may have to rehang the doors at at a lower height and add a filler at the top.

A. Spruce
Re: Gap Under Interior French Doors

I'd be inclined to leave it alone. The gap is a little wide, however, if you have forced air HVAC, then the gap will help keep that room to temperature.

If you absolutely must shorten the gap, then I'd install a filler strip that is the same wood/finish as the door, then I'd install brass kick plates to either side to hide the seam. Quick, simple, acceptable in most situations. If you want to keep the doors pristine, then Jack's recommendation of shortening the jams would be the way to go. The thing here, though, expect damage to the trim and jamb in the removal process, plus the likelihood of a paint line above the door when the trim is jimmied down 3/4". That's an awful lot of work and hassles for 3/4" less gap under the door.

dj1
Re: Gap Under Interior French Doors

" b) add a trim piece to the faces of the doors. I personally don't think either option will look that good, but I know that gap will drive me mad."

Why do you think it doesn't look that good? It's done all the time.

ed21
Re: Gap Under Interior French Doors

I think spruces idea with the brass kick plate would be simplest and look good.
The gap wouldn't bother me. Do the doors typically remain open? If so the gap would be less noticeable anyway.
It looks like the trim and floor turned out nice. Stained and varnished trim is even harder to remove and reinstall than painted since you won't be repainting.

Re: Gap Under Interior French Doors

Thanks for the input, guys. I really like the kickplate idea. I've never been able to a good match on the stain in this house, so anything I add is gonna stick out pretty badly (to me at least). Like was said above, I think the damage I'd cause trying to reframe the opening would outweigh the benefits.

If I use a brass kickplate, I wonder if my contractor buddy would be able to bend it in his break, then I could have one continuous piece on each door. I'd also have to strip the varnish off the brass and see how quickly it'll catch up with the patina on the rest of the hardware... but I think that'll be the least "invasive" option.

And, yeah, we keep those doors closed so we don't have to hear the kids' computer noises.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Gap Under Interior French Doors

Earphones will work too.

Jeanne
Re: Gap Under Interior French Doors

You can remove the lacquer that often comes on brass fixtures (to keep them shiny) with acetone. It shouldn't take too long for it to oxidize to a nice patina.
See: http://www.marthastewart.com/911871/how-remove-lacquer-brass-fixtures

ed21
Re: Gap Under Interior French Doors

It occurred to me that kick plates don't usually span the whole width of the door. The thickness of the plate would likely bind on the stop. Just something to think about.
Baldwin sells non-lacquered kick plates. http://www.baldwinhardwaredirect.com/shop/pc/Baldwin-2001-8-x-34-Kickplate-27p1219.htm#.U0dMVie9KSM

ordjen
Re: Gap Under Interior French Doors

Some of the newer kick plates are a brass/titanium alloy which does not tarnish.

Against that older woodwork, it might look good to deliberately chemically tarnish the brass to an aged patina.

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