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Sidecarsawyer
Replace bathroom tile: how to raise level?

Hey there.
I need to replace the tile in my bathroom. I would like to keep a boarder of the current tile around the perimeter of the bathroom. Problem is I punched out one of the marble tiles to see what I was dealing with underneath. It's 1/2 inch tile on top of cement board. Is there a solution for raising the level of my new 1/4 tile to match the level of the exsisting tile? The new tile is 2 inch hex tiles which I think is too small for Ditre.
Another piece of cement board? On top of exsisting cement board?
Thanks for your help
This is my first time doing tile so my apologies.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Replace bathroom tile: how to raise level?

Cement board comes in ½ and ¼ inch. However, I have to wonder if it would make a better bed to remove the existing cement board which will no doubt have residue making it non level. Once that is done you could install ¼ inch plywood followed by ½ inch cement board.

Jack

Forrest
Re: Replace bathroom tile: how to raise level?
Sidecarsawyer wrote:

This is my first time doing tile so my apologies.

I would say that its worth just tearing it all out and starting fresh. You didn't mention how big the boarder is, but I picture a few 12x12 or less ceramic tiles boarding the room. The problem you will have by leaving the boarder

1) You won't match the height exactly and you won't be able to cut a super clean cut to get a good grout line in the finish
2) There is a lot of risk chipping the boarder tile, once one of them chip, its all over. Also keep in mind that cutting into the cement board/tile is not very easy, even with power tools. Its VERY dusty, and not using the right tools, with the right amount of power, with the right blades you will do more damage.
3) anytime you cut into a floor like that, you are creating a seam between the new and old tile, and that seam goes directly down to the wood subfloor. Water will infiltrate and you might have mold problems down the road
4) As a first timer, this is not a first timer job, matching tile, height etc...

Take my advice, save the hassle, start from a fresh clean slate. You'll learn much better. In my years of doing remodeling and construction, unless your saving a significant amount of money is saving old work, then rip it all out and start brand new.

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