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frdrmom
Corrugated translucent roofing
frdrmom

My husband added a small sun room to our 1830 Ohio farmhouse, and used a corrugated-type translucent roofing. There are four sheets, and the joints, edges, etc. are bonded with silicone, ribbon caulk, and a wavy kind of foam that is used where the pieces join.

We have high winds here and are surrounded by open farm fields. The roof leaks. He's done everything he can think of. We don't want to lose the light from that roof - the yard is shady - but are beginning to think we don't have a choice.

Is there another kind of joining material or bonding stuff or....? Is there another kind of roofing that will give us all the light we want? He doesn't want to do the finish work inside until the roof is finally right, and can't find a roofing solution that doesn't leak.

llmotoll
Re: Corrugated translucent roofing
llmotoll

O.H.! O.I.! Go Buckeyes!!

Well, there are options you could try before you replace the panels and loose the natural sunlight.

First need to explain that there are two types of seams on this assembly.Vertical and Horizontal.

Vertical - run parallel with slope or corrugation & visa-versa with horizontal seams.

The next most important thing is span on the joist should not exceed five feet. Two to three feet is better. And screws with an EPDM washer should be used for attachment in lieu of nails definitely not ring shank nails. The fastening pattern should be 1 screw through the high rib 12" on center at each joist. Horizontal seams screws should NOT penetrate a joist.

Vertical seams don't really require any sealant they just need to be screwed every 12" on center or often enough to ensure positive connection and no gaps or rainbow affect between attachment points. If horizontal seam screws penetrate the framing it will subject the joint to unnecessary expansion and contraction which will cause sealant failure.

Assuming panel assembly meets these installation guidelines.
Option#1 - First try to open the horizontal seams and remove any previously installed silicone sealant. Replace with butyl tape ( http://www.bestmaterials.com/detail.aspx?ID=19987&gclid=CLC4-7ei_MgCFcERHwodTN0MMA ) two strips deep/ side by side not on top of each other recessed underneath the top lap approximately 1/4" Next step can be a messy one, apply a bead of Water block mastic ( http://www.waterblocksystems.com/Userfiles/Docs/TechData_Sopramastic.pdf ) in the middle of the two lines of butyl tape making sure to have no breaks in the bead, one continuous line Then stitch screw the seam back together 2-3" on center using a drill point #17 screw with an EPDM washer. Be very gentle as they will strip out very easily good and snug is all you want. Very important to make sure the screws penetrate directly through the center of the mastic sealant.

Option#2 - KarnaFlex white coating http://www.karnakcorp.com/502.aspx . Apply in a three course application over all seams. This is simple and easy however dark shadow lines will show through from underneath so you may want use masking tape to keep it straight and pretty and it will require routine maintenance every 3-5 years. It has no temperature application requirements it just must be a dry surface and should not be exposed to rain for at least 1 hour.
If it is cold outside during application you may want to keep the bucket warm inside prior to use. Applied at a rate of 1.5 gallons per 100 square feet or 80 mil dry thickness per layer

llmotoll
Re: Corrugated translucent roofing
llmotoll

One other important thing. Sometimes you just assume some things but just to make sure. panels of this type require a minimum of 1/12 slope. Any less than that and it will likely leak no mater what you do.
And the over lap on the horizontal seams should be a minimum of 8" - 12"

llmotoll
Re: Corrugated translucent roofing
llmotoll

Transparent aluminum roof panels would be awesome! Good luck finding them. We have been wanting to use these for some time now. Pretty amazing stuff.

dj1
Re: Corrugated translucent roofing
dj1

Quote: "Is there another kind of roofing that will give us all the light we want?"

The right roof for a sun room is glass, special glass for this purpose, made for sun rooms.

What you have up there will not stand OH weather, snow, storms, buckets of rain, wind, tornadoes - are you kidding me? Plastic corrugated roof panels are for shade, used in patios, chicken coops, small storage areas, etc. metal corrugated panels are stronger, but will not give you any light.

Without know how it's built, It's hard to recommend anything.

If I want a sun room, I build a SUN ROOM.

If I want a storage shed, I build it like a small garage and roof it with shingles. Want light? add a skylight.

Fencepost
Re: Corrugated translucent roofing
Fencepost

Fasteners should only penetrate ONE layer of panels. If it penetrates two layers, that invites leaks.

A. Spruce
Re: Corrugated translucent roofing
A. Spruce
dj1 wrote:

The right roof for a sun room is glass, special glass for this purpose, made for sun rooms.

X2, along with everything else you stated.

Corrugated panels are not suitable for habitable structures for a multitude of reasons, leaking is a big one! Build it right, it will last a life time, build it like crap and that is exactly what you will have and will get to deal with for the rest of your life.

Fencepost
Re: Corrugated translucent roofing
Fencepost
A. Spruce wrote:

Corrugated panels are not suitable for habitable structures for a multitude of reasons, leaking is a big one! Build it right, it will last a life time, build it like crap and that is exactly what you will have and will get to deal with for the rest of your life.

The biggest problem with corrugated panels is that all plastics are degraded by ultraviolet light. Some are more resistant than others. Clear plastics generally are the least UV resistant; for most plastics, it's the pigments in colored plastic that inhibit UV degradation. Black is the most UV resistant.

radiogal
Re: Corrugated translucent roofing
radiogal
llmotoll wrote:

Transparent aluminum roof panels would be awesome! Good luck finding them. We have been wanting to use these for some time now. Pretty amazing stuff.

Well, when you find those see-through aluminum panels, you might want to alert the Department of Defense. They would be very interested to hear of this novel material!

Now, those translucent plastic jobs are just for temporary greenhouse windows or chicken coops- but to install it as a "sun-room" roof on an 1830 house?? Oh DEAR... Hope hubby steers clear of any more "DIY" projects.

walt
Re: Corrugated translucent roofing
walt
frdrmom wrote:

My husband added a small sun room to our 1830 Ohio farmhouse, and used a corrugated-type translucent roofing. There are four sheets, and the joints, edges, etc. are bonded with silicone, ribbon caulk, and a wavy kind of foam that is used where the pieces join.

We have high winds here and are surrounded by open farm fields. The roof leaks. He's done everything he can think of. We don't want to lose the light from that roof - the yard is shady - but are beginning to think we don't have a choice.

Is there another kind of joining material or bonding stuff or....? Is there another kind of roofing that will give us all the light we want? He doesn't want to do the finish work inside until the roof is finally right, and can't find a roofing solution that doesn't leak.

I did the same thing years ago and use a heavy grade of translucent roofing. It lasted quite a while but I did have a few small leaks, not bad but ours wasn't a sun room, it was more of a covered deck. If you are planning a closed in sun room, then I wouldn't do it. If it's a outside deck, that's a different story. If you're in a snow area, I wouldn't do it at all. I replaced mine a while ago and used the heaviest lattice I could find. I get about the same amount of light, but no where near the leaves. Water doesn't hurt my outside furniture.

The post from llmotoll is one option or a solid roof with Skylights

Good luck

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