We may be compensated if you purchase through links on our website. Our Reviews Team is committed to delivering honest, objective, and independent reviews on home products and services.More
Exterior covered patio with fireplace and furniture. Wood ceiling with skylights.

How Much Does Adding a Roof Over a Patio Cost? (2024 Pricing)

Typical Cost Range: $4,500 – $11,000

Invalid Zip Code
Enter details in under 3 minutes

Join more than 6,755 people who have received a free, no-obligation quote in the last 30 days

Powered by Home Service Quotes

Default Author Icon Written by Angela Bunt + 1 other Reviewer Icon Reviewed by Mark Howey Updated 05/21/2024

If you’re thinking about customizing your outdoor living area, consider covering your deck or patio to protect it from the elements and enjoy it year-round. The average cost of a patio roof is about $6,500, while the typical range is between $4,500 and $11,000. Depending on the covering type and size, this price can vary from a few hundred to tens of thousands of dollars.* Learn about various cost factors and get saving tips in our guide.

*Article cost data sourced from Angi, Fixr, and Home Advisor.

Use our expert research to learn more about your project

Enter your ZIP code and tell us about your home

Match with local experts who can meet your needs

Get Your Roofing Project Quote Today
Compare quotes from local pros

What Factors Affect Patio Roof Construction Cost?

The factors that most impact patio roof costs are the type of cover chosen, the materials used, the project’s size and complexity, and any added features.

Cost by Type of Cover

Patio and deck coverings range from simple fabric sheeting to full extensions of a house’s existing roof. Here are the most common types of patio and deck roofs.

Type of RoofCost Range
Canopy$100–$500
Shed roof$1,000–$10,000
Awning$1,400–$4,200
Gable roof$2,200–$13,500
Pergola$2,500–$6,000
Louvered roof$4,320–$20,700
Gazebo$7,500–$10,000

The simplest type of roof cover is a fabric canopy, usually made of sailcloth, stretched over the patio’s top. Sometimes called a sun shade, the canopy can be freestanding on poles or attached to the house’s roof. Although water-resistant, these canopies are rarely completely waterproof and may not provide total direct sunlight protection. However, they are the least expensive option at $100–$500 for materials, plus another $1,000 for installation.

An awning is a thin roof cover that extends from a building’s side. Awnings can be made of canvas materials, metal, wood, or polycarbonate sheeting. They may be fixed or retractable, meaning they can fold or roll up when not in use. An awning is sturdier than a canopy but not as durable as an actual roof structure. It may cost anywhere from $1,400–$4,200, depending on the material and support structures used.

A lean-to or shed roof is typically a single, sloped roof attached to the house on the uphill side with a beam or wall on the downhill end. It’s one of the simplest, most cost-effective permanent patio roof options, but also one of the least aesthetically appealing. These roof structures are usually made entirely of aluminum or framed-in wood and get covered in roofing material. They range in price from $1,000 for a kit to over $10,000 when installed.

A gable roof’s symmetrical, triangular design makes it a very popular configuration. To cover a patio, a gable roof can either extend out from the home’s existing roof or be free-standing, and it’s usually made to match your home’s roof. Depending on the gable’s height and the shingles’ material, a gable patio roof can be relatively affordable at $2,200 on the low end or $13,500 on the high end.

A pergola is an open roof structure with a series of parallel rafters supported by posts, typically made of cedar or redwood. Pergolas offer some shade, but they don’t keep out rain or other precipitation. They’re often chosen for their aesthetic appeal. They can serve as a framework for greenery, such as flowers or vines, or be left bare. They’re slightly costlier to build, ranging from $2,500–$6,000, and they often require more maintenance than other options.

A louvered patio roof is similar in structure to a pergola, but the slats are narrower and able to rotate open and closed. They’re typically made from metal or synthetic materials, and require a motor to close the slats with the push of a button. They’re more expensive because they’re motorized, starting at $4,320 and ranging up to $20,700. However, they combine a pergola’s benefits with those of a solid roof.

A gazebo has no sides, is supported by columns, and has a solid roof. It’s a type of hip roof that comes to a high point in the center and slopes down on all sides. The simplest of these are four-sided, but traditional gazebos have eight sides. There’s often a raised vent in the roof’s center for extra ventilation. This roof structure has multiple surfaces and may have raised peaks, thus starting at the highest price point of around $7,500–$10,000.


Cost by Materials

The first choice you’ll need to make before picking materials is the roof type you want. Some materials are better suited to certain types of roof structures, and each has pros and cons in terms of durability and price.

Vinyl can be made into simple panels as well as latticework and planks for pergolas. It’s inexpensive but fades in sunlight, isn’t durable in heavy snowfall, and may crack or warp over time, so it’s not the best for outdoor use.

Wood is a versatile material that can serve as a basic roofing structure or stand on its own as latticework or a pergola. It has a classic look but often requires regular cleaning and refinishing. The price will largely depend on the choice of wood. Redwood, cedar, and pressure-treated Southern pine are most common, but other woods can be used when painted.

Fiberglass is an excellent insulator that works well for a heat-resistant roof. It’s more durable than vinyl but just as low-maintenance. It can be shaped into panels, latticework, pergolas, and more.

Aluminum patio covers may take the form of panels, latticework, or pergolas, but louvered roofs are almost always made of this lightweight metal. A rolled aluminum roof will be less expensive than extruded aluminum.

Glass blocks out the rain but can magnify heat, so these patio coverings are useful in mild-to-cool climates. These roofs are typically formed from glass panels.

Insulated panels may be constructed of fiberglass, wood, or aluminum exteriors with insulating material inside. They provide extra protection against heat and are the most expensive patio roofing material.

Here are some price ranges for common roofing materials.

MaterialCost Range
Vinyl$5–$13
Wood$15–$35
Fiberglass$16–$39
Aluminum$20–$70
Glass$25–$45
Insulated panels$26–$59

Cost by Size

Since roofing materials are usually priced by the square foot, the larger your patio, the more it will cost to cover. A small bistro patio that accommodates only a small table and a few chairs will naturally cost much less to cover than a large outdoor entertainment space. Assuming a material cost range of $5–$59 per square foot, here’s how much various patio roof sizes will cost.

Patio Size (in Feet)Square FootageCost Range
6’x7′42$210–$2,478
12’x12′144$720–$8,496
12’x14′168$840–$9,912
12’x18′216$1,080–$12,744
20’x20′400$2,000–$23,600
18’x24′432$2,160–$25,488
24’x36′864$4,320–$50,976

Cost by Customizations

Your new patio or deck roof can be a simple covering or a fully functional roof and ceiling with electrical wiring and indoor features. While these will increase the total project cost, they can make your patio roof even more functional.

FeatureCost Range
Ceiling fan$70–$4,000
Heater$100–$500
Lighting$260–$4,500
Skylight$1,021–$2737

Labor Cost

You can hire a professional for nearly any roof type. Installation for simpler coverings, such as canopies and awnings, will be much cheaper and quicker. In general, labor costs for covering a patio range from about $10–$30 per square foot on top of material costs.

Get Your Roofing Project Quote Today
Compare quotes from local pros

What Are The Benefits of a Patio Roof?

Some benefits of adding a roof over your patio include protection from weather, reduced patio maintenance, increased resale value, and extended living space. Here’s what homeowners stand to gain by installing a roof over an existing deck or patio.

Protection From Weather

While a patio’s appeal is that it takes advantage of outdoor space, you may not be able to use it in inclement weather. Spring and summer rains can come on suddenly. Even when the weather is good, direct summer sunlight can render your outdoor space too hot to use. A covered patio isn’t subject to the same weather restrictions.

Reduced Maintenance

A roof that protects a patio also protects what’s underneath it. Patio features such as outdoor furniture and decking last longer and require less maintenance when they’re not subject to precipitation and direct sunlight. If your deck is covered, you won’t need to worry about faded pavers or moldy patio furniture.

Increased Resale Value

Since a covered deck or patio is more usable, it adds more to the value of your home than an uncovered space. The exact return on investment (ROI) will depend on the type of roofing material selected, your location, and real estate trends, but many prospective home buyers value a functional outdoor living space. Adding a roof is a good way to bring new life to your deck.

Extended Living Space

Although it may not count as official square footage, a covered deck can allow you to use more of your property. When your patio is covered, you can eat meals and entertain outdoors without worrying about the weather. Those living in mild climates can use a patio as an extension of their home, potentially putting in an outdoor kitchen, bar, or hot tub.

Improved Energy Efficiency

A well-built roof can help regulate your patio temperature and the home’s interior. Particularly if you have large windows, extending the roof will block excess sunlight, keeping your home cooler in the summer months. Your air conditioner won’t have to work as hard, and you’ll save on your utility bills.


What Additional Patio Covering Costs Should You Consider?

Depending on your project’s specifics, the following cost factors may also play a role.

Building Codes and Permits

Simple coverings like canopies may not require a building permit, but more substantial construction likely will. Almost any roof attached to the home will probably need drawings and may require engineering, especially if you have snow and wind loads to consider.  Plans and engineering can range from a couple of hundred dollars to several thousand dollars for a roof structure. Any electrical additions will require a permit as well.

Check with your local municipality to see what permits are required based on your desired structure, and be prepared to pay $350–$1,800.

Drainage

An important roof function is directing precipitation away from your home’s foundation to prevent water damage. Depending on your chosen roof type and local climate, you may need to ensure that rain falling on your patio drains away properly. This could mean installing gutters and downspouts at the cost of about $3–$20 per linear foot, depending on the material. You might also need a more sophisticated in-ground system, like digging a drainage slope ($3,024–$18,792) or installing French drains ($3,424–$20,292).

Locality

Patio cover costs will be higher where the cost of living is higher. Additionally, in areas that receive extreme weather like tornadoes and hurricanes, you’ll likely have to build in extra bracing or support for the new patio roof. This will require more in terms of both material and installation costs.

Repair and Reinforcement

Existing concrete patios and wood decks aren’t usually designed to carry the weight of a roof, so expect there to be concrete piers and posts to support the new structure. Additionally, any rot or warping of deck materials may need to be repaired before roof construction can start. Treated lumber typically costs between $8 and $20 per square foot, so the final cost of repair or reinforcement will depend on how much of the deck needs replacing.

Total Patio Enclosure

Beyond adding a roof, you can further enclose your patio to protect it from the elements. The least expensive option is screening in the walls, which typically costs $5–$7 per square foot once the patio and roof are built. Check out some porch design inspiration to see what the finished product can look like. Glass walls, which would turn your porch into a sunroom, usually fall between $30 and $95 per square foot of wall space, including materials and installation. On the high end is a life room, which includes luxury amenities such as motorized screens, climate control systems, and entertainment centers. Converting a patio to a life room will cost $10,000 on the low end, but can range up to $100,000 or more.


Can You Add a Roof Over Your Patio Yourself?

Some simple patio roof coverings can be do-it-yourself (DIY) home improvement projects, but others require hiring professionals.

DIY Patio Roofs

Some canopies, awnings, and even pergolas are sold as DIY kits that you can build yourself. These typically contain the beams, panels, and fasteners, though you’ll need to supply your own power tools. Some of these structures are free-standing, while others attach to your home. If your new roof structure attaches to the home’s siding or rafter ends, be aware of potential water intrusion at the attachment points.

Professional Patio Roofs

If you want a full roof system complete with rafters, shingles, and gutters, you should hire a general building contractor. They’ll be able to create a roof that meets all necessary local building codes and will hire electricians, roofers, and painters to finish the project. Though you’ll pay extra labor costs, professionals can complete the job quickly and ensure that it’s up to code.


How To Save on Installing a Patio Covering

Here are some tips for keeping costs down when covering your deck or patio.

Keep it simple. If all you want is shade, simple canopies or awnings can do the job at a much lower price than a full roof.
If you have a large patio or deck, covering only part of it may provide enough functionality. 
Balance up-front costs with long-term durability and return on investment. A DIY kit or cheap materials may save you money now, but they could require extra maintenance or limit the project’s resale value.
If your ultimate goal is a luxury porch, start with the basics now and add features as you can. For example, if you commission a well-built roof structure now, you can add lighting and ceiling fans down the road.

Is it Worth Adding a Roof Over Your Patio?

You can choose from several options to cover your patio or deck, whether you want something simple and inexpensive or more complex and high-end. Before installing a new patio roof, consider the cost and how you plan to use the space. Also, consider how much time and money you’re willing to spend on maintenance, and discuss your options with a professional contractor if possible. At the same time, it might make sense to find out the price for a new roof if it is in disrepair and to match the look of a patio roof. A well-built patio roof covering can last for decades.

Get Your Roofing Project Quote Today
Compare quotes from local pros

FAQs About the Cost to Add a Roof Over a Patio

How much does it cost to install a patio roof?

A patio roof’s cost depends heavily on the chosen roof type and materials, but the average cost is around $6,500.

Is it more expensive to install a patio roof on a concrete patio versus a wood deck?

The relative prices of patio and roof decks will depend on a number of variables, including the roof type and the deck’s condition. If the deck requires extra reinforcements to support a roof, it may be more expensive to cover than a patio.

Will installing a patio roof add value to my home?

Yes, covering your patio will add to the resale value of your home. However, a midrange, functional roof will have a better return on investment than a luxury patio enclosure.

Are there any additional costs I should be aware of besides the cost of materials and labor?

When covering your deck or patio with a roof, you should be aware of the following costs:

  • Building permits
  • New or upgraded drainage
  • Repairs to existing deck or patio
  • Extra support necessitated by extreme weather

To share feedback or ask a question about this article, send a note to our Reviews Team at reviews@thisoldhousereviews.com.