More in Appliances

Choosing and Using Wet/Dry Vacs

They suck up everything from chunks of plaster and nails to microscopic drywall dust and pools of water.

Photo by Nedjelko Matura
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The mess that comes with drilling, sawing, sanding, and demolishing can be formidable — consisting of debris that's at once too rough, too large, and too fine for the average household vacuum cleaner. The answer is stored in millions of garages and basement workshops: wet/dry vacuums. The fat hose, strong motor, and big tank of a good vac suck up everything from chunks of plaster and nails to microscopic drywall dust and pools of water. Some even have detachable motors that can be used as leaf blowers.

Wet/dry vacs range in size and power from hand-carried 1-gallon models to heavy 20-gallon monsters. A small portable or rolling vacuum is fine for the occasional minor job (and makes a great car vacuum as well), but anyone getting into a large renovation project should consider investing in (or renting) a bigger machine.

The mess that comes with drilling, sawing, sanding, and demolishing can be formidable — consisting of debris that's at once too rough, too large, and too fine for the average household vacuum cleaner. The answer is stored in millions of garages and basement workshops: wet/dry vacuums. The fat hose, strong motor, and big tank of a good vac suck up everything from chunks of plaster and nails to microscopic drywall dust and pools of water. Some even have detachable motors that can be used as leaf blowers.

Wet/dry vacs range in size and power from hand-carried 1-gallon models to heavy 20-gallon monsters. A small portable or rolling vacuum is fine for the occasional minor job (and makes a great car vacuum as well), but anyone getting into a large renovation project should consider investing in (or renting) a bigger machine.

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The Essentials

 

The Essentials

The essentials of a vacuum cleaner
Photo by Nedjelko Matura
Hose
Hose diameters vary from model to model; the manufacturer matches the size to power and capacity. You will have some choice on hose length. A longer hose is more convenient, but length reduces suction.

Hose-Tank Connection
Where the hose attaches to the tank, look for a screw-on or locking connection so it doesn't pull loose when you tug on the vacuum.

Noise
Shop vacs make a lot of noise: 85 decibels and up is typical of unmuffled units, 60 db for those with mufflers. Decibel levels above 80 require ear protection. (Always wear ear protection when the vac is connected to a power tool.) An add-on muffler (about $10) quiets most vacs to acceptable levels.

Filters
Since wood dust is a carcinogen, choose a vac that comes with a HEPA filter, which can trap particles smaller than 1 micron. (Or buy one to fit your vacuum for $25 to $70.) Look for models with a filter bag inside the tank, so you don't end up with a mushroom cloud of dust when you empty the tank.

Auto Shut-off
An internal switch should automatically shut off the vac when the tank is full.

Water Feature
Some models work as a pump, which lets you hook up a garden hose to clear out a flood.

Tank
Bigger might seem better, until you have to empty it when it's full of water. A 10- or 12-gallon capacity is the most practical for household use. Plastic is lighter and cheaper than stainless steel, but steel is more durable. Tall vacs can tip easily. Low units are more stable, but this limits capacity. Try pulling the vac by the hose — if it tips, don't buy it.

Wheels
Four wheels are better than three, and at least the front two should swivel. Outrigger wheels improve stability but require a wider path and are more likely to get tangled.

Attachments
Most vacs include a floor sweep, crevice tool, car upholstery tool, and a wide water blade. Make sure the tools can be stored on-board so you have what you need where you need it.

Drain Valve
Saves the trouble of grappling with a water-filled tank to empty it.

Cord Length
Watch out for a short power cord, which forces you to drag around your own heavy-duty extension cord. Look for a built-in cord reel for long cords.

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Power Specs

 

Power Specs

Hooking up power tools to a vacuum cleaner
Photo by Nedjelko Matura
Manufacturers rate vac power by many measurements, each of which means something different.
  • Power draw in amperes. More is better, up to 12 amps; more than that can trip a typical household circuit.
  • Peak horsepower. Measures maximum power. Not a good indicator of performance, but sometimes the only spec available. Look for 1.5 to 2 hp on small machines; at least 3.5 on larger ones.
  • Sealed suction or sealed pressure in inches of water lift. Measures the motor's suction power with no air flow. Look for 50 inches or more.
  • Air flow in cubic feet per minute (cfm). Tells how powerfully the motor draws in air, and factors in restrictions like filters and bags. Best comparison between similar machines. Anything less than 90 cfm isn't very effective.
  • Air watts, which combines air flow with sealed suction. Useful for comparing two similarly configured machines; 250 air watts and up is good.


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Hooking Up Power Tools

 

Hooking Up Power Tools

Wall-hung vacuum cleaner: Shop-Vac Hangup Pro
Photo by Nedjelko Matura
Wall-Hung
Uses: Quick, permanent access in a garage or workshop without set-up time or storage issues.
Capacity: 3.5 to 5 gallons
Features: 3 to 4.5 peak hp. All the hoses on hanging vacs are 18 feet, so if your workspace is bigger, you'll need an extension (though this reduces suction).
Expect to Pay: $70 to $90.
Shown: Shop-Vac Hangup Pro, $70.
Many power tools come with exhaust ports for attaching a vac hose to directly suck away dust or wood chips. However, unless your power tools and vac are made by the same manufacturer, you'll probably need a universal adapter (less than $10) or a roll of duct tape to connect the hose.

Better still is a vacuum that has an outlet for plugging in the tool. The outlet is wired with a delay switch so the vac starts up when you turn on the tool and stays on for several seconds after you turn it off, to clear the hose and tool.

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Different Needs, Different Vacs

 

Different Needs, Different Vacs

Craftsman Professional 12-gallon industrial wet/dry vac
Photo by Nedjelko Matura
Industrial
Uses: Demolition and construction site cleanup.
Capacity: Up to 20 gallons.
Features: Tough but weighty stainless steel tank on a rolling cart; 80-plus inches of water lift.
Expect to Pay: $225 and up for smaller models, at least $400 for 12 gallons or more; $25 to $45 a day to rent.
Shown: Craftsman Professional 12-gallon industrial wet/dry vac, $500.
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Where to Find It

 

Where to Find It

DeWalt cordless or corded wet/dry 2-gallon vac
Photo by Nedjelko Matura
Portable
Uses: Cleaning up small jobs, such as patching drywall, sanding wood, or clearing out a dryer duct.
Capacity: 1 to 4 gallons.
Features: Small, easy-to-tote tank with handle. Some are cordless, with batteries from 12 to 18 volts. Cordless handhelds without a hose are not very powerful; those with a hose are
1 to 2 peak hp.
Expect to Pay: $30 to $100, plus another $80 for a battery for some cordless models.
Shown: DeWalt cordless or corded wet/dry 2-gallon vac, $100.
The Essentials —
Featured shop vac:
Craftsman 16-gallon wet/dry vac
model# 00917038000
800-549-4505
www.craftsman.com

Different Needs, Different Vacs —
Portable:
DeWalt cordless or corded wet/dry 2-gallon vac
model# DC50
800-433-9258
www.shopvac.com

Tool-triggered:
Porter-Cable 10-gallon wet/dry vac
model# 7812
877-800-1612
www.porter-cable.com

Industrial:
Craftsman Professional 12-gallon industrial wet/dry vac
model# 00917924000

Large capacity with pump:
Same as featured.
 
 

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