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goppel
Sod repair

I laid down sod in my front lawn and some of it didn't make it. It dries up no matter how much watering I did. Now O have patches of dead spots. The majority of it took and looks great. How can I fix the parts that didn't stay alive, without ripping out 4ft sections?

dj1
Re: Sod repair

Did you correctly prepare the soil before you laid down the sod?

Did you use any starter fertilizer before you laid down the sod?

Is your new sod exposed to too much sun and not enough shade during the day?

Was your sod fresh upon arrival?

Is your new sod the best kind for your environment?

Skipping and overlooking important steps can cause sod failure. It's not always the lack of water that kills the sod.

ed21
Re: Sod repair

Can't you just buy more of the same sod and then cut the dead out and patch in new.
Then water every day for a while until it takes. It should take a lot of water each day, but don't let it dry out. Good prep as mentioned should help.

A. Spruce
Re: Sod repair

Patching sod is as easy as laying it. All you do is cut out the bad spots and put in new sod. Personally, I have a sod knife, which is to say, I have a particular knife that is dedicated to the duties of sod cutting and nothing else. All you need is something to cut through the plastic webbing that stabilizes the sod so that it can be cut and rolled, nothing fancy, just needs to be long enough to cut through about an inch of soil and roots.

dj1
Re: Sod repair

Spruce, cutting sod with a knife dulls the knife rather quickly.

I once did a sod job, and used a sharpening stone on the knife. Towards the end of the job, I needed to sharpen it every other cut and by then the blade was reduced by 50%.

What kind is your "special knife" ?

A. Spruce
Re: Sod repair
dj1 wrote:

Spruce, cutting sod with a knife dulls the knife rather quickly.

I once did a sod job, and used a sharpening stone on the knife. Towards the end of the job, I needed to sharpen it every other cut and by then the blade was reduced by 50%.

What kind is your "special knife" ?

I have a folding buck knife, it has a heavy blade that is 6" long. The ONLY thing it will cut is sod! LOL But, as I said, sod is the only thing I cut with it, and it does just fine. I've also used my utility knife for the same purpose, but I hate doing that, the blade really isn't long enough and I don't like getting the thing caked with mud and dirt.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Sod repair

we normally use a hatchet which can be very dull and still quite effective

A. Spruce
Re: Sod repair
HoustonRemodeler wrote:

we normally use a hatchet which can be very dull and still quite effective

Reminds me of my favorite line, "measure it with a micrometer, mark it with a chalk, cut it with an ax!" :p:cool:

Mastercarpentry
Re: Sod repair

The next time you're at the local junk sale, pick up an old high-carbon steel kitchen knife (the kind that rusts). Nobody else will want it so it won't cost over a buck. Sharpen before storing and cover it with Crisco, not petroleum grease or oil which can contaminate and kill the roots. It will be you last sod knife and the edge will last 5 times longer than anything else you've ever used. If you find a pair, use the other one for fiberglass insulation with the same benefits. That one can be oiled or greased against rust. No stainless steel even comes close to old carbon steel for knives, you just gotta keep the rust chased away!

Phil

A. Spruce
Re: Sod repair

Phil, that's just crazy enough that it might work! :p:cool: Thanks for the tips, always looking for improvements in tooling, even if you have to go back a few decades for those improvements! :p;):cool:

goppel
Re: Sod repair

I did all the steps that I read from a lot of different places. I did use starter fertilizer, and peat moss under the sod. But like a said only bits and pieces didn't take. Is there any way to reseed sod, without having to rip it up?

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