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DOOB0831
Shake shingles
DOOB0831

A good many years ago I had professionals paint the wood trim on the first floor of my house, which is fieldstone, and put "water repellant /stain" on the shake shingles which are on the 2nd floor. The paint didn't last more than 5 years and began to peel (Sherwin Williams), so I repainted the trim myself using Valspar, which has lasted close to 10 years already.

My question is what kind of "water repellant / stain" do I use on the shake shingles? Oil base? Water base? The home is 90+ years and they are in good shape and Id like to keep them that way. They have not been painted and I don't want to paint them. What would be the best application for the water repellant / stain? Would Thompsons water seal work? Someone told me to use a "marine" grade water repellant. If that's what I need, where would I find it?

Thanks kindly
Dee

dj1
Re: Shake shingles
dj1

A lot depends on your situation and sun exposure.

Water based stains will retain the color longer than oil based stains. Choose a solid color stain. Cabot makes good stains.

ordjen
Re: Shake shingles
ordjen

dj1 is correct in stating that a solid hide acrylic stain will give the longest life to your shingles, however, a solid hide stain appears much like paint, obscuring the grain of the wood.

If you want to retain the natural look, a transparent oil stain will both give the water repellency you seek, while allowing the grain to show. Being transparent, whatever coloration is already there will influence its final appearance. To lighten the color and get rid of existing gray weathering, wash the singles down with a deck cleaner containing oxalic acid. Behr makes such a cleaner, as well as most of the stain manufacturers. I apply this cleaner using a high pressure siphon tip on my pressure washer. Such a tip will allow you to siphon directly from the plastic cleaner bottle and shoot it up 15 to 20 feet. The siding must be kept wet with the solution for about 20 minutes, not letting it dry out. This is a good job for a cool, cloudy day. Once the bleaching, cleaning effect has occurred, rinse the wall down using a pencil 0 degree tip sprayed from WAY back, You don't want to gouge the wood from being too close with the zero degree tip as it is quite powerful. You want to be back far enough so that only a very vigorous stream is hitting the siding.

After letting the shingles dry down for a couple days, you can begin staining with the oil stain. This can be sprayed, but "back brushing" is highly recommended to get the stain into the grain of the wood and into the edges where the shingles meet. Spraying alone does not do a good job! Of course, the whole job can be brushed, but it is a slow process.

Oil stain will have to be refreshed about ever 3 or 4 years. The biggest advantage to oil stains is that they penetrate and don't leave a surface film, or heavy build-up, as do the acrylic/latex products. Any paint or "stain" that forms a surface film has the potential to peel, including solid hide stains. If peeling occurs, you really have a project on your hands!

Mastercarpentry
Re: Shake shingles
Mastercarpentry
ordjen wrote:

The biggest advantage to oil stains is that they penetrate

And this is why I also recommend them. Being in the wood instead of just on top of it helps make the wood last as it becomes part of the wood. When a surface coating fails the wood becomes unprotected instantly in that spot but the oil stain will still protect. The disadvantages are the more frequent renewal needed and less UV protection on the surface as it ages but with regular renewal the shakes should last practically forever using oil stain. I like Cabot's products for this but any top-name-brand product will serve you well.

Phil

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