Home>Discussions>NEW DIY IDEAS>Salvage>Salvaged car siding as flooring?
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thebrowns96
Salvaged car siding as flooring?

We were given some salvaged car siding that had previously been face nailed. I thought it might make a nice rustic looking floor in our pantry/laundry but I've no idea how we should do it. We've never used salvaged materials for a project like this before. Any ideas from someone with experience? I'm also wondering about finishing - what would hold up best over time for this type of flooring? I was thinking of a painted or pickled finish, but I'm sure it will need additional sealant of some kind.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: Salvaged car siding as flooring?

car siding ??:confused:

thebrowns96
Re: Salvaged car siding as flooring?

like this: crap, it won't let me post links yet - look on line at Menards under wood siding, they have a 1x8x6 tongue & groove carsiding

It's normally used for walls, but I have heard some people have used it for flooring.

dj1
Re: Salvaged car siding as flooring?

Strange use for this wood, but hey, it was free - go for it. What's the worst that can happen? won't fly, just rip it out.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Salvaged car siding as flooring?
HoustonRemodeler wrote:

car siding ??:confused:

Think of an old wooden sided caboose HR. Around here it's called barn siding.

Jack

California_Cookie
Re: Salvaged car siding as flooring?
thebrowns96 wrote:

like this: crap, it won't let me post links yet - look on line at Menards under wood siding, they have a 1x8x6 tongue & groove carsiding.

I believe this is the link to the item...

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Salvaged car siding as flooring?

Now as to The OP's question. If it is old car siding made of oak or yellow pine it is usable for flooring. If it is newer and made of white wood it would be to soft for flooring. Although I have seen it used for that.

Jack

California_Cookie
Re: Salvaged car siding as flooring?

Speaking of non-traditional flooring, I was at a linolium store once, looking for a neutral floor covering, and one huge role was a tawny beige with flecks of wood in it and maybe even what looked like string...and the salesperson said it was the underflooring that's usually put under linolium.

She said one modern, high end store had used it in their loft space after putting a lot of sealer and varnish on it...but that they couldn't guarantee how well it would stand up to foot traffic, as it wasn't intended for that purpose.

Anyway, I liked the way it looked, and have always wondered if that product actually could make a semi-durable floor material.

thebrowns96
Re: Salvaged car siding as flooring?

Ours is pretty old, and it looks like yellow pine to me, so I think we are OK there. I'm mostly wondering if face nailing (since there are holes from previous installation) would hold well & look OK, or if we should do a more traditional installation and just fill those holes.

That linoleum underlayment you mentioned is some pretty neat looking stuff; it probably would look cool. But I don't know how long it would hold up, even heavily sealed!

notmrjohn
Re: Salvaged car siding as flooring?

Avoid face nailing. Nail just like it was regular T&G flooring, angle nail and set nails thru tongue. Use ring shank or candy coat nails.
One reason for T&G is to hide nails, not a problem here. More important reason reason is to allow flooring to expand, contract without bowing, cracking, or popping nails. Groove slides over tongue, tongue covers gap.

Finish with something that drys as hard as you can find. Yellow pine not as hard as other floors. But with nail holes and character already there, nicks dings etc will just add more. Small can of slightly lighter stain, or tinted wax on hand to cover big gouges showing lighter wood. Will eventually darken to blend in with older dings.

thebrowns96
Re: Salvaged car siding as flooring?

Thank you! That was hub's vote as well - I will let him know about the nails. And thanks for the info on finishing.

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