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bricksonsecond
Restoring hardwood floor
bricksonsecond

We just started on our dining room. We found we have hardwood floor under the carpet. But between the carpet and the wood is linoleum.
So my question is, should we try to get all the adhesive from the linoleum off before to take a sander to it?

Thanks.

dj1
Re: Restoring hardwood floor
dj1

Depends on the age of the linoleum. Old glue may contain asbestos, so sanding in an enclosed area would not be a good idea for a novice. Call some flooring contractors, if you don't know how to continue.

bricksonsecond
Re: Restoring hardwood floor
bricksonsecond

I will not hire out any small job only big jobs, lake framing a house. Contractors are often a joke.

Anyone else have any actual advice? Will the adhesive just gum up the sander, or will it be fine? I've not used a floor sander, but plan (hope) to in the future as well.

A. Spruce
Re: Restoring hardwood floor
A. Spruce
bricksonsecond wrote:

I will not hire out any small job only big jobs, lake framing a house. Contractors are often a joke.

Hmmm, come to a site that is primarily contractors offering their time free of charge to answer your questions, then insult them. Quite obviously you need help with your little project that you think you can handle yourself. Well, go handle it, since we are all a joke to you. We are well aware that there are some bad apples in the industry that sully the rest of us, you can say this of EVERY profession, so don't lump us all together just because you may have had a bad experience with an idiot. Also, your experience with the people you hire is just as much a reflection on YOU as it is the quality of the people in question. If you're having a problem with these people, then maybe you should check your attitude at the door and hire people that are capable of doing the job, rather than people who are willing to put up with a client like you.

Now, as far as your question, DJ's answer is correct, considering the information provided, you offered no details as to how old the house is or whether it is really linoleum or a more modern vinyl derivative? There are other questions and concerns that will likely come up as well, the deeper you get into this discussion. But, that's ok, you don't sweat the little stuff and don't need the help of jokers.

Enjoy your project.:cool:

dj1
Re: Restoring hardwood floor
dj1

Quote: "I will not hire out any small job only big jobs, lake framing a house"

That's fine, if you knew how to do ANY SMALL JOB yourself.

Quote: "Contractors are often a joke"

Pretty nasty of you to say that. I can understand it if you mistrust contractors and handymen with small projects in your fabulous 1880 hillside mansion. But to proclaim that every contractor is a joke? You are the joke.

Quote: "Anyone else have any actual advice?"

You call a lawyer for advice, he tells you it will be $300. Why do you expect a free advice from contractors you despise?

I won't even comment on the rest of the original posting. Why don't your project, as you plan, and then fill us in with the details. Don't forget the mask.

bricksonsecond
Re: Restoring hardwood floor
bricksonsecond

Really?
1) I have been watching This Old House my entire life. It is not a website JUST for contractors. Because I am not a contractor.
2) I've had bad experiences with contractors. The ones I got because my house was government owned when we purchased it (because the bank literally made us), a) quoted us 6 weeks max, but took 6 months. b) did handyman work, that is according to our inspector (who was very thorough). The inspector told our general contractor to his face he did handyman quality work. Contractor said "I ran out of mortar, so I just left it." My inspector said, "go buy another bag, what is it cost? 3 dollars. That is what they are paying you to do." c) the plumber stole our copper pipe which we specifically told him to leave there and he stole our step stool. He also ran our kitchen sink pipe through the middle of a cabinet. That is on top of all the other issues we had with them - like tracking mud in, deciding things on their own, only pulling the permits once I called the city to ask if permits had been pulled since I saw none handing up in the house, and leaving scaffolding up for the entire 6 months.
Sorry if I don't trust contractors much.

I grew up in a household where my parents literally did all their own housework. My parents had a house framed, and they proceeded to to every single other thing themselves - plumbing, electrical, flooring, walls, pouring the floor, roofing, etc. Then they moved to another house, and pretty much redid everything.

I want to learn to do everything myself. That is why I am on this particular website, asking peoples advice. I'm not going to hire out a job unless it is something that I could royally screw up. My want to 1) save money, 2) learn a skill, and 3) have pride in my own work. These are things I have wanted to learn my whole life. I wouldn't have bought a fixer upper if I didn't plan to do everything myself. I would have purchased a house that looked pretty. Not a house that had, pretty much, a inch-thick book of things that needed to be fixed (inspection report).

Jesus Christ.

A. Spruce
Re: Restoring hardwood floor
A. Spruce

We commend you for wanting to learn to do things for yourself, however, you CANNOT throw punches at people and expect a warm welcome. If ALL contractors are jokes, by your account, then why do you think you're going to get any helpful advice from them? Again, by your own account, you had ONE bad experience in a situation reportedly outside of your control, yet, in your eyes, everyone is to blame for that experience, so no one is to be trusted. Sorry, but with an attitude like this, you aren't going to garner much sympathy or support.

Instead, why don't you ask your questions politely? We are more than happy to help when we're not being punched in the face first. Why not assume that we're not all jokes, give us the benefit of the doubt until proven otherwise? As I said earlier, there are bad apples in ALL walks of life, including your own profession, so don't be casting aspersions when you don't even know who you're dealing with.

Now, as far as your original question is concerned, it is quite possible that there is asbestos in both the flooring and the glue, depending on the age of the house (which you've never told us, however I've extrapolated this vital info from your signature line ). This doesn't mean you can't clean it up, just that precautions need to be taken. If you care about the presence of asbestos, have the materials tested first, if you don't care, then do whatever you want.

Lino removal: If it is the black tar stuff, you will need a product called "cut back remover". You will need to go to a contractors flooring supplier for this, your local big box isn't going to have it. This is a messy process, it's like playing with molten tar, it gets everywhere and it doesn't come off, so have protective clothing and supplies on hand and use care in handling it. Because it is tar like, it will instantly clog sanding materials, so you either get 99% of it off, or you're going to be going through a whole lot of sanding materials trying to do so. If the lino utilizes a more modern glue, then scr-ape as much as you can before sanding, and change your sand paper frequently.

dj1
Re: Restoring hardwood floor
dj1

At this point I have absolutely no comments.

bricksonsecond
Re: Restoring hardwood floor
bricksonsecond

A, Thank you for the response.

DJ, then don't comment.

The "hire a contractor" comment that I got here and I see often elsewhere is not something that 1. is in my budget or 2. in my nature. I won't, will never, hire out a job to a contractor because frankly 99% of the jobs I will do in my house do not require it. My husband is very handy and willing to learn as well, and my father lives 2 miles away. But my father has not lived/worked in a house as old as mine (1880). Learning is part of what people do. Telling someone to hire a contractor is not actual advice, as least in my eyes. If I wanted to hire a contractor, I would have just done it and not asked questions on an ****** forum. Also, I know how to do plenty of things - all of which I have learned over time, and plenty of it I have learned from watching TOH.

And part of the reason I am on here is that everyone I've talked to in person has told me to use heat, which didn't help (tried both a hair dryer and a heat gun), because the adhesive crap is no longer sticky. It is dried and solid.
Either way, we're half done with getting it off the floor - a lot of time, and a lot of aches, but we'll be done by next week.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Restoring hardwood floor
Sombreuil_mongrel

Place a wet towel on the floor adhesive, some of the black crap is water-soluble; If not, then you can try to sand it off (if it's tar-based or contact adhesive it will gum up the abrasive so fast) or you can use a 1 1/2" paint scr-aper (figure out how to sharpen it with a file- keep it sharp) and get the upper-body workout of a lifetime scraping it all off. I have scr-aped several floors by hand. Wear a mask, or just try not to think about what you are breathing in.
ps: some scr-aperrs clog up because there is no room for the leavings to go when they come off; red devil makes the best scr-apers for heat gun or gummy scraping, they have all open space behind the blade. http://preview.tinyurl.com/gsagsuj

I had to make a tinyurl, because the URL had scr-aper in it, which does not escape the bot-mod. :/

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