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livingfine
no prep paint

we're looking to paint our house in the spring. saw the 'max bond' paint at the hardware store. says no prep necessary: don't have wash, sc****, sand. anyone use this stuff and can recommend it?

ordjen
Re: no prep paint

ANY paint needs a clean, non-oxidized surface with the old paint firmly adhered. Granted, some paints exhibit better adhesion than others. Washing should ALWAYS be done, especially if mildew or algae is present. There is always some dirt and oxidation present. Washing and bleaching will take care of it. A good powerwashing is the easiest way to accomplish the washing. Washing up under the eaves is especially important, as these areas never get rainwashed. Sanding is not neccessarily needed for adhesion if the existing paint is a satin or lower sheen. However, sanding will "feather" old peeling areas. If will give better adhesion over higher gloss surfaces.

I am not familiar with this particular product, but sight unseen, I would wager that the directions do advise you to do much of the prep work I have mentioned. It is the old adage, " an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure"!

dj1
Re: no prep paint

Try it and let us know.

Personally I don't buy it. Prep work, in some cases very little work, is needed for exterior paint job.

HoustonRemodeler
Re: no prep paint

Prep work is usually the major and most important part of any paint job. This isn't the area to skimp on.

Mastercarpentry
Re: no prep paint

I've never seen the top coat of paint fail- never! But I've seen an awful lot of cases where the coats underneath did, and those are what the hard part of prepwork address. Nothing you put on top can possibly be better than what's underneath it There is no "magic bullet" with paint. Do the prep correctly or you'll be re-doing the paint far too soon no matter what kind it is or who makes it.

Phil

E
Re: no prep paint
Mastercarpentry wrote:

I've never seen the top coat of paint fail- never! But I've seen an awful lot of cases where the coats underneath did, and those are what the hard part of prepwork address. Nothing you put on top can possibly be better than what's underneath it There is no "magic bullet" with paint. Do the prep correctly or you'll be re-doing the paint far too soon no matter what kind it is or who makes it.

Phil

,

I hope you can expand on that. Because I sand, prime, paint, second coat (min of 24 hours drying between each) and within 2 years, the exterior window trim paint is peeling completely off. Makes me CRAZY. Last year I decided I've had it. Tried to pry the trim off and replace with vinyl brick moulding. Much to my surprise, the entire window started to fall inward, so I hammered it back in place, since it appeared to be what was holding the entire window in. And so an assessment today, 7 of the windows need to be sc****d, sanded, primed and painted AGAIN.

Any advice would be helpful, with the exception of "buy new windows". There is extreme heat (min 12 hours of full sun) on these.

Mastercarpentry
Re: no prep paint
AmeliaAirhead wrote:

,

I hope you can expand on that. Because I sand, prime, paint, second coat (min of 24 hours drying between each) and within 2 years, the exterior window trim paint is peeling completely off. Makes me CRAZY. Last year I decided I've had it. Tried to pry the trim off and replace with vinyl brick moulding. Much to my surprise, the entire window started to fall inward, so I hammered it back in place, since it appeared to be what was holding the entire window in. And so an assessment today, 7 of the windows need to be sc****d, sanded, primed and painted AGAIN.

Any advice would be helpful, with the exception of "buy new windows". There is extreme heat (min 12 hours of full sun) on these.

Are you using high quality primer and paints formulated for your climate, and are these compatible with the paint underneath them? Most old houses have oil-based paints on them, and some do not seem to like having a latex paint on top of them. Usually it's a deeper older latex layer that fails but I guess a latex top coat could as well. Color is also important when sunlight is strong- light colors only here, the darker ones can collect too much heat then blister, crack, or peel. What material are we covering here, wood? Is it pressure treated or has it ever had any kind of stain applied to it? Some oily woods will not take paint. You can't blame a top coat for not working if there is a problem underneath it; the paint itself didn't fail when that happens.

Phil

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