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schlo
load to much for gfci

Hello,I have two separate loads,feeding (temporaliy),from one gfci feed.20a..there is 250ft of 14/2,,and a few outdoor lights. 800w of lights.The second load is 150ft,14/2 and 300w of lights. When I plug both in,I trip the gfci,not the breaker,,I have a CLAMP METER,can I go on a hot wire for each individual load,when on,and try to determine the amp draw??thanks,each of these loads work OK by themselves.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: load to much for gfci

800 W plus 300 W equals 1100 W divided by 120 volts = 9.17 amps no where near 20 amps. GFCI are tripped by a difference in current flow between the "hot" and "neutral" not by excessive current. The breaker didn't trip so you are not drawing more than 20 amps. DO NOT "hot wire" , find the cause.
Jack

schlo
Re: load to much for gfci

U are right,I will find the cause or run new leg.My 2nd question,for a little education, is with the clamp meter..can I go on one leg(hot),at any point on the wiring and test the amp draw??when the load is lighting?thanks

Gray Watson
Re: load to much for gfci
schlo wrote:

Hello,I have two separate loads,feeding (temporaliy),from one gfci feed.20a..there is 250ft of 14/2,,and a few outdoor lights. 800w of lights.The second load is 150ft,14/2 and 300w of lights. When I plug both in,I trip the gfci,not the breaker,,I have a CLAMP METER,can I go on a hot wire for each individual load,when on,and try to determine the amp draw??thanks,each of these loads work OK by themselves.

14/2 should be protected by 15 amp max, for long distances may have to increase size.

Sensors on these outdoor lights (motion/light levels) timers? Power supplies/transformers?

Newer GFCI's have lock-out protection.

Suspect a wiring error or fault. Water infiltration, condensation, continuity, poor bond to ground all possibilities.

Voltage drop issues also possible.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: load to much for gfci
schlo wrote:

U are right,I will find the cause or run new leg.My 2nd question,for a little education, is with the clamp meter..can I go on one leg(hot),at any point on the wiring and test the amp draw??when the load is lighting?thanks

Yes you just need to make sure you seperate the legs.
Jack

JLMCDANIEL
Re: load to much for gfci
Gray Watson wrote:

14/2 should be protected by 15 amp max, for long distances may have to increase size.

Sensors on these outdoor lights (motion/light levels) timers? Power supplies/transformers?

Newer GFCI's have lock-out protection.

Suspect a wiring error or fault. Water infiltration, condensation, continuity, poor bond to ground all possibilities.

Voltage drop issues also possible.

Because this is a plugged in circuit it is not necessary to have 15 amp protection, however the rest of your post is valid.
Jack

Gray Watson
Re: load to much for gfci
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Because this is a plugged in circuit it is not necessary to have 15 amp protection, however the rest of your post is valid.
Jack

I didn't see where he said that. Figured a deadfront GFCI with two loops one 250 ft out the other 100 ft out on 14/2. Either way 14/2 shouldn't be part of a 20 amp circuit.

Unless you're saying he's throwing a cap on 14/2 and plugging it into a GFCI receptacle on one end and wiring the other end to a receptacle in a box? (which would be very bad)

JLMCDANIEL
Re: load to much for gfci

In the OP he said "When I plug both in" .
Jack

Gray Watson
Re: load to much for gfci

True but also said temporary and also mentioned the new leg, so I'd call that a leap in logic.

Rather depend on the author to indicate the meaning since not clear at all that was refering to a cord cap.

I suspect this is a continued effort on this other discussion about tripping GFCI, pool and yard lighting:

http://advice.thisoldhouse.com/showthread.php?t=11178

14 awg doesn't belong on a 20 amp circuit.

If this is the same project Schlo needs qualified on-site help. You must have EGC near pool.

Bonding pool area essential.

A Pro can check service bond and check for stray voltage from drop, pole and transformer locations.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: load to much for gfci

Does that mean I can't plug the 14 awg extension cord for the hedge clippers into the 20 amp outside outlet I have, or that I should unplug all the table lamps with 18 awg cords that are pluged into outlets on a 20amp circuit?
Jack

Gray Watson
Re: load to much for gfci
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

Does that mean I can't plug the 14 awg extension cord for the hedge clippers into the 20 amp outside outlet I have, or that I should unplug all the table lamps with 18 awg cords that are pluged into outlets on a 20amp circuit?
Jack

?????:confused:????? Where do you come up with that???? and what does that have to do with the price of tea in China?

350 ft. of 14/2 and 150 ft. of 14/2 That's what the original post says. 20 amps.

14 awg doesn't belong on a 20 amp circuit, certainly not 350 feet of it to a 800 watt load and another 150 feet of it to 300 watts in the circuit!

I doubt that 18 awg lamp cord is for 800 watts of lighting or is more than 6 feet long.

Extension cords aren't legs.;)

Since when do we assume 14-2 is extension cord?

Since when do we consider an extension cord, portable lamp, or a portable appliance or tool part of a circuit or the premisis wiring system?

A GFCI is not a replacement for a bonded equipment grounding conductor. Outdoors and pool areas especially. Metal cases, non-isolated motors, basically anything with a 3-prong cord cap requires the presence of an ECG, isolated from neutral and bonded back to the panel.

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