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daotm98
Antique Clock Finish

We have an Antique Oak Wall Clock late 1800's. One of the small doors to the clock works on the side of the clock was missing so I made one. The color of the finish on the clock is the rich dark reddish brown most antique oak peices acquire over the years. I have not been sucessful in even coming close matching the original finish. I have tried mixing some Mahogany stain in with the Oak finish to give it some red highlights. Has anyone any suggestions?

daotm98:confused:

A. Spruce
Re: Antique Clock Finish

Go to Sherwin Williams (paint store ) and have them color match it. They've always done a reasonable job on my projects. Another option may be to contact a furniture maker for assistance in mixing the right color. You'll need the original piece to match and a few samples of the replacement piece for them to test and play with.

goldhiller
Re: Antique Clock Finish

"rich dark reddish brown most antique oak peices acquire over the years"

Me thinks you're not looking at the natural patina of the wood at all. I suspect that either that clock was originally stained or dyed or fumed .....or.....the color you see is the oxidized old varnish....or a combination of these.

Does it look anything like this?

http://www.homesteadfinishing.com/htdocs/mission_oak.htm

"any suggestions?"

Yes....bring it over to the shop and I'll likely have it matched up and clear-coated in less than two hours. A true match will likely necessitate the use of coloring products that you won't find at a hardware store or paint store.

Like Sprucey said.......your best bet may well be to find an experienced furniture/cabinet shop and take it to them. They *should* have the necessary coloring agents/products to do the deed.

daotm98
Re: Antique Clock Finish
DwarfWytch wrote:

Amber shellac (a few coats). Then some colored furniture wax overtop as needed to adjust the color, while you await oxidation of your replacement piece (old english makes a line of such).

The original case may have been slightly ammonia fumed to darken the oak, or dyed with pigments in grain filling hide glue or cassien glue.

Thanks for the input I'll give it a try

daotm98

daotm98
Re: Antique Clock Finish
goldhiller wrote:

"rich dark reddish brown most antique oak peices acquire over the years"

Me thinks you're not looking at the natural patina of the wood at all. I suspect that either that clock was originally stained or dyed or fumed .....or.....the color you see is the oxidized old varnish....or a combination of these.

Does it look anything like this?

http://www.homesteadfinishing.com/htdocs/mission_oak.htm

"any suggestions?"

Yes....bring it over to the shop and I'll likely have it matched up and clear-coated in less than two hours. A true match will likely necessitate the use of coloring products that you won't find at a hardware store or paint store.

Like Sprucey said.......your best bet may well be to find an experienced furniture/cabinet shop and take it to them. They *should* have the necessary coloring agents/products to do the deed.

I went ahead and printed out your instructions. I appreciate your response. Thanks again

daotm98

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