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Get the Right Door For Your House

A door is one of the telltale details that distinguishes the style of a house. So if your entry is due for an upgrade, let the look of your place help you pick the best match

Get the Right Door For Your House

Illustration by Jason Lee

A door is one of the telltale details that distinguishes the style of a house. So if your entry is due for an upgrade, let the look of your place help you pick the best match

Queen Anne

Illustration by Jason Lee

The Victorian-era doors have either a single pane or leaded glass in their tops and elaborate carvings and moldings below. This raised-panel prehung red oak door with a single window, flanked by sidelights: about $4,950; HeartWood

Craftsman

Illustration by Jason Lee

Chunky doors celebrate honest construction with flat, rectangular panels. Windows may have elaborate leaded-glass lights. This white oak slab door with Frank Lloyd Wright–style windows and dentil molding: about $1,050; Sheppard Doors & Glass

Ranch

Illustration by Jason Lee

Contemporary doors match an exterior marked by clean horizontal lines. This alternating glass-and-knotty-alder wood slab door: about $1,500; Doors By Decora

Tudor Revival

Illustration by Jason Lee

Loosely adapted from the English Renaissance, Tudors have board-and-batten doors, often with arched or pointed tops and a single small light. This 2 ¼-inch-thick slat-style African mahogany slab door starts at about $1,800; Clark Hall Doors

Cape Cod

Illustration by Jason Lee

Harking back to its origin as a colonial-era fisherman's cottage, the doors of this post–World War II style often have raised panels and upper windows. This four-panel pine slab door with two lights: about $200; JELD-WEN

Colonial Revival

Illustration by Jason Lee

Raised-panel doors have a symmetrical formality and are often accented with a fanlight and flanking sidelights. This prehung five-panel Spanish cedar door surrounded by true divided lights: about $11,500; Marvin Windows and Doors