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VA_JAM
New to this Forum

Hey Everyone,

I am new to homeownership, home maintenance/repair, and to this forum.

Even more, my wife and I recently fell in love with and purchased our first home.

Constructed in 1948, our place had all the character and then some that we dreamed about. The previous owners kept it in pristine condition but with it's age it isn't without projects.

With the winter now here, we are noticing that the place isn't insulated very well. There isn't any type of insulation barrier behind the walls (my father-in-law and I recently repaired a hole in a bedroom wall and there wasn't anything but an air space behind the drywall)

What common practices are there for 'beefing' up insulation in older construction homes? Any experienced tips would be very helpful.

VA_JAM
Re: New to this Forum

I will add that our crawl space seems to be insulated well to my knowledge. :/ Fiberglass (the pink stuff) is tucked between the floor joists and we have a plastic vapor barrier sheeting covering 95% or more of the earth bed.

Again, my largest concern is what to do about in between the walls and attic space.

Thanks!

canuk
Re: New to this Forum

I would recommend looking into having cellulose insulation blown into the walls and your attic space. It's a common product used and works well.
This can be done with little damage to the walls of the home , either from the exterior or interior.

Hopefully this helps.:)

VA_JAM
Re: New to this Forum

Thanks for the input! I have heard about cellulose before...now time to research it.

Shubi
Re: New to this Forum

We use cellulose for all exterior wall applications that are not constructed of brick or stone (moisture can penetrate masonry.) The trick is to find a machine setup that will allow you to dense pack the walls with at least a 1 1/4" ID sidewall tube. Lift sections of siding, drill 2 9/16" holes in each cavity, insert the sidewall tube up the wall and pump to acceptance gradually pulling the tube down as it dense packs. The machine should have a blower pressure of 3 - 4 psi for proper dense pack. Proper insulation can be obtained using the one inch hole method, but it is much more tricky to properly dense pack, and requires at least 2 holes per cavity per floor. One inching is also prone to hose plugging, which is quite irritating. Be sure to get above and below windows. If the home is of balloon construction, fireblocks may also require drilling above and below them. You can find 2 9/16" wood plugs to plug the holes after dense packing at Applied Energy Products, www.appliednrg.com
Replace siding and you're done, leaving your house warmer with little or no visual evidence of work done.

VA_JAM wrote:

Hey Everyone,

I am new to homeownership, home maintenance/repair, and to this forum.

Even more, my wife and I recently fell in love with and purchased our first home.

Constructed in 1948, our place had all the character and then some that we dreamed about. The previous owners kept it in pristine condition but with it's age it isn't without projects.

With the winter now here, we are noticing that the place isn't insulated very well. There isn't any type of insulation barrier behind the walls (my father-in-law and I recently repaired a hole in a bedroom wall and there wasn't anything but an air space behind the drywall)

What common practices are there for 'beefing' up insulation in older construction homes? Any experienced tips would be very helpful.

foammaster
Re: New to this Forum

you might think about injection foam, it has a higher R-value than cellulose and will not settle over time.

injectionfaom.com
i'm sure someone is close to you
JB

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