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STEELMA02
gambrel ventilation

I've recently had MassSave come out to do an air seal but they could not do it at the present time because the fear of possible mold. So attic ventilation is my question, i have a gambrel roof. with ridge and soffit and gabel vents. my ridge is poorly designed (to narrow), my gabels are not to code and my soffits are in my opinion located in the wrong spot. the soffit vents in the front of the house are at the height of the 2nd floor floor's. which means the venting has to climb 8 feet up the wall and another foot above the attic insulation. is there an alternative? can i install vents in the trim the meets the top roof line to the slant roof?

MtMan54
Re: gambrel ventilation
STEELMA02 wrote:

I've recently had MassSave come out to do an air seal but they could not do it at the present time because the fear of possible mold. So attic ventilation is my question, i have a gambrel roof. with ridge and soffit and gabel vents. my ridge is poorly designed (to narrow), my gabels are not to code and my soffits are in my opinion located in the wrong spot. the soffit vents in the front of the house are at the height of the 2nd floor floor's. which means the venting has to climb 8 feet up the wall and another foot above the attic insulation. is there an alternative? can i install vents in the trim the meets the top roof line to the slant roof?

Hi, Are you trying to lower your heat bill? Thanks

MLB Construction
Re: gambrel ventilation

if you're vents are low in relation to the height of the attic, you can install a ridge vent. this will allow the fresh air to come in the gable end vents, be heated in the attic space and rise out of the ridge vent. you could also install a powered, temperature controlled, roof vent up close to the ridge.

what part of mass are you in?

keith3267
Re: gambrel ventilation

Your soffit vents are in the correct place. They go under the eves which on a gambrel roof are level with the floor where the roof starts. The steep portion is being used as a wall, but it is still roof and it needs to be vented as such. You can use either a ridge vent in the top, but because of the very flat angle of the ridge, it may not be as rain tight as it would be with a greater pitch. You may want to use gable vents instead, and if done right, should be adequate.

If that MassSave air seal is a foam insulation sprayed on the underside of your roof between the rafters, I would advise against it.

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