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Best Bath Before and Afters 2010

You submitted thousands of remodels, then voted on your favorites. Here are the top-rated bathroom transformations from This Old House's 2010 Reader Remodel Contest

Your Time to Shine

You've amazed us once again. When we asked you to submit your remodel projects for our third annual Reader Remodel Contest, more than 1,300 of you responded with renovations that showed just how talented and hardworking you all are. Here's a look at 30 of your top picks for bathroom revamps chosen by TOH editors and your fellow readers.

After you've seen these out-of-this-world projects, submit your own bath remodel at Your Old House.

WINNER! Vintage Bath Face-Lift: Before

Who: Amy H.

Where: Franklin, IN

Our guest bathroom was much like every other room in our 1875 house—completely devoid of character and original features after being a rental.

WINNER! Vintage Bath Face-Lift: After

Who: Amy H.

Where: Franklin, IN

We moved the original clawfoot from this room into the master bathroom because we thought we were going to do a tub/shower combination. After doing some measurements, we were forced into a separate tub and shower combo- which was fantastic! We did all the work ourselves, except hanging the custom glass for the shower. A restored chandelier and antique pendants, new (heated!) tile floor, a $40 antique desk turned into a vanity all made for a great room. For privacy, we frosted one window, and installed a stained glass find from an antique store in the other window.

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $5,000 to $10,000

Classy Bath Facelift: Before

Who: Kendall G.

Where: Hamilton, IL

Our tiny bathroom was last remodeled in 1959. The space was tight, and there was only one outlet, no fan, and bad lighting. Sure, there was a shower, but I longed for a tub to soak in.

Classy Bath Facelift: After

Who: Kendall G.

Where: Hamilton, IL

Reclaiming space from a nearby walk-in closet allowed us to add a jetted tub, framed by an arched alcove that adds plenty of charm. With tiled walls and glass and chrome shelves, the room now feels like a spa-like retreat.

Who did the work: I did some of the work myself

Cost: $5,000 to $10,000

Period Style Family Bath: Before

Who: Megan M.

Where: Highland Park, IL

This bathroom in our 1922 farmhouse quickly moved to the top of the priority list because previous owners stole the toilet and left a 1960's yellow version, neither attached nor working, in its place. Visitors told us the bathroom was scary to use!

Period Style Family Bath: After

Who: Megan M.

Where: Highland Park, IL

A salvage Wolff sink, hexagonal tile, and clawfoot tub add plenty of period charm, while rubber duckies keep the space playful for our kids.

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $1,000 to $5,000

From Inside the Pantry to Full-Fledged Bath: Before

Who: Brennan W.

Where: Suffield, CT

Far from classy and downright depressing, this bathroom's cramped quarters almost cost me my relationship! The house was built in the 1830s, and the only bathroom in the house had been built in the pantry when indoor plumbing was installed in the 60s. The door would only open half way because it hit the sink, your knees would hit the wall when sitting on the toilet, and you had to stand sideways in the shower.

From Inside the Pantry to Full-Fledged Bath: After

Who: Brennan W.

Where: Suffield, CT

Beadboard accents, crown molding, and chrome adorn our new 100-square-foot bathroom. It was fitted with a spacious subway and marble tile shower with rain head fixture. The claw foot tub was salvaged and restored. A stackable washer and dryer are concealed by a French door style beadboard cabinet. My girlfriend loved the results so much she ended up marrying me!

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $5,000 to $10,000

Arts and Crafts Adobe Bath: Before

Who: Elizabeth S.

Where: Minneapolis, MN

When we moved into our 1919 bungalow, we knew we'd have to deal with the bathroom eventually. It had pink plastic tile, a window that looked directly into the neighbors' house, a small stained bathtub, and gaps between the tile and the wall.

Arts and Crafts Adobe Bath: After

Who: Elizabeth S.

Where: Minneapolis, MN

We replaced the tub with a walk-in shower and brought the pipes up to code. The subway tile and shower floor are a nod to the house's history, and the handmade talavera accent tiles tie in to our native plant gardens. Two recessed tile niches provide some storage and interest. To finish it all off, we painted the walls with a no-VOC paint in a warm Arts and Crafts adobe color.

Who did the work: A contractor did all the work

Cost: $10,000 to $25,000

Archaic Bath Updated: Before

Who: Amanda H.

Where: New Madrid, MO

Our bathroom was archaic and was in need of remodeling. We had a huge jacuzzi that never got used, and everything was bland and boring.

Archaic Bath Updated: After

Who: Amanda H.

Where: New Madrid, MO

We gutted the entire bathroom from ceilings to floor, even the walls. We installed a pocket door and had a custom made shower door installed. The original cost of project was to be $15,000, but we ended up going over the budget due to the way the trusses had been installed.

Who did the work: A contractor did all the work

Cost: $25,000 to $50,000

Spa-Like Retreat's a Treat: Before

Who: Victoria B.

Where: Flossmoor, IL

Although we did not have any intention of remodeling our outdated master bath, the "opportunity" presented itself when we discovered the shower pan had cracked. Out came the cheap tile and dated pattern, the big acrylic blue jetted tub we never used, and the stock home center cabinets.

Spa-Like Retreat's a Treat: After

Who: Victoria B.

Where: Flossmoor, IL

Our main goal was to put in a larger, luxurious shower, so we expanded the shower and replaced our tub with a lovely, smaller claw foot. Installing a pocket door gave us more usable space. A clear glass shower surround make the space feel even bigger while two shower heads and two water tiles make us feel like we are in a spa! To help create an old cottage feel, we installed composite bead board and chose soapstone.

Who did the work: I did some of the work myself

Cost: $10,000 to $25,000

Updated Old Pink Bath: Before

Who: Christopher A.

Where: Vista, CA

After living in our 820-square-foot house (built in 1942) for a number of years, my wife and I decided that it was time for some major upgrades to our sad looking bathrooms.

Updated Old Pink Bath: After

Who: Christopher A.

Where: Vista, CA

All of the tile in this bath is limestone, except for the upper part of the shower, which is tumbled travertine. The fixtures are Kohler and faucets Moen. Cabinetry is semi custom Cherry wood in chocolate glaze built by Kraftmaid. The countertop is crema marafil marble.

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $5,000 to $10,000

Stone Backsplash Bath: Before

Who: Jacob N.

Where: Robbinsdale, MN

My wife and I just completed our main floor bath in our 1956 ranch. We replaced the 54-year-old pink tiled bathroom with what we can only hope will last another 50 years!

Stone Backsplash Bath: After

Who: Jacob N.

Where: Robbinsdale, MN

A dark wood vanity and stone backsplash has a calm, soothing effect in our new bath. Pendants flank the mirror, adding a touch of the modern to the otherwise rustic space.

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $1,000 to $5,000

New Baby, New Bathroom: Before

Who: Brooke S.

Where: Wyckoff, NJ

We knew our recently purchased 1925 Cotswold Cottage had serious plumbing problems when part of the ceiling collapsed in our downstairs guest bedroom. The 1970s-era fiberglass shower/tub combo was cracked at the drain and had been leaking for years. Getting a replacement tub up to the second floor was impractical, and we had a baby on the way.

New Baby, New Bathroom: After

Who: Brooke S.

Where: Wyckoff, NJ

We decided the solution was a large shower with generous seat, storage shelves, and a faucet mounted at a height suitable for filling a baby's bathtub. We designed the tile pattern of shower and floor to evoke an Arts and Crafts motif. We hand-painted the window shade to echo the pattern. We chose oil-rub bronze faucets, drawer pulls, towel bars and hooks.

Who did the work: I did some of the work myself

Cost: $10,000 to $25,000

$800 Bargain Bath Redo: Before

Who: Nick A.

Where: Stafford Springs, CT

Our recently purchased lake cottage has a very small bathroom, which was painted a uniform pale blue, floored with linoleum, and dominated by an oversized mirror with an cheap gilt frame. On removing the mirror, we were surprised to realize that it blocked a window to the outside. An unfortunate way to block the natural light, sure, but also it was the only place a mirror could effectively be placed.

$800 Bargain Bath Redo: After

Who: Nick A.

Where: Stafford Springs, CT

An old farmhouse window frame surrounded by colored glass panels ($15) with a piece of mirror glass for the center area became the focal point of the new bathroom. To replace the cheap vanity, we replaced the top of an old sewing machine ($75) with an oak countertop ($60) and installed a copper sink and faucet set ($100). We put in bamboo flooring ($100), halogen track lighting ($50), and painted in warm earth tones. The total cost was under $800.

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $500 to $1000

Deco Touches in an Updated Bath: Before

Who: Christine R.

Where: Santa Ana, CA

Our newly purchased 1938 home's bathroom looked like it had been remodeled in the 50s or 60s. The blue and cream colors were drab, the cabinets were falling apart, and the toilet behind the door seemed awkward. The only original item in the room was the bathtub.

Deco Touches in an Updated Bath: After

Who: Christine R.

Where: Santa Ana, CA

Wanting to restore some original features back to the room, we choose common depression era colors (white, black, and green). The square lines on the cabinetry and mirrors match the lines on the original bathroom door and the windows. We moved the toilet, added double sinks, and installed a frameless shower on the original bathtub to create an open and modern feel.

Who did the work: A contractor did all the work

Cost: $5,000 to $10,000

Beachy Blue Vintage Bath: Before

Who: Amy H.

Where: Franklin, IN

We made over the master bath in our 1875 home to fit in with the age and character of the house, which had been stripped away after years of being a rental unit. Now we are trying to bring it back, on a budget!

Beachy Blue Vintage Bath: After

Who: Amy H.

Where: Franklin, IN

We moved the toilet across the room to free up floor space for a rusted claw-foot tub. We also took an antique dresser and converted it into a vanity showcasing a copper sink and oil-rubbed bronze faucet. A new laminate wood floor replaced the vinyl, and a new chandelier and matching sconces brought new light into the room. A $5 can of mistake paint from the hardware store sets the tone for a vintage beachy feel. We did it all for $3,110!

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $1,000 to $5,000

Bath Befitting a Queen Anne: Before

Who: James S.

Where: Newport, KY

Our home is an 1894 Queen Anne that suffered from an 80s bathroom fix-up. We wanted to update the bath with new fixtures, lighting, and cabinets while preserving the classic feel of the home.

Bath Befitting a Queen Anne: After

Who: James S.

Where: Newport, KY

We kept the clawfoot tub and tile floor but replaced everything else. The bead board wainscot ties in white materials used elsewhere in the home while adding vintage appeal. The cabinets are dark cherry with a Staron countertop.

Who did the work: I did some of the work myself

Cost: $5,000 to $10,000

Period-Inspired Blue Bath: Before

Who: Joy M.

Where: Nevada City, CA

My husband and I recently bought our first home, and it is the epitome of a fixer-upper. The master bath was initially low on the list but was bumped up when we realized it would be a very bad idea to install new hardwood floor in the hall outside the bath and then remodel the bath later. We didn't want to risk our beautiful new floors.

Period-Inspired Blue Bath: After

Who: Joy M.

Where: Nevada City, CA

We gutted the room down to the studs, changed all of the wiring, tore out a dropped ceiling, and converted a closet from the neighboring bedroom. The sink, shower, and toilet were all moved, and we added a claw foot tub. We also put new windows in and added an exhaust fan. My husband did all of the work himself, except for the plumbing and tiling. He even made the cabinets out of scrap left over from the trim.

Who did the work: I did some of the work myself

Cost: $5,000 to $10,000

Same Tile, New Look: Before

Who: Molly S.

Where: Marietta, GA

When we bought this 50-year-old house, everyone told us we should rip out the tile in this bathroom and start over. I refused. It think it's beautiful!

Same Tile, New Look: After

Who: Molly S.

Where: Marietta, GA

We pulled up the carpet and were pleasantly surprised that there was tile underneath. The formica countertop color didn't match, but we ran the risk of breaking the tile if we tried to remove it. We had a contractor fabricate a "poly-stone" top that wraps around and over the old top and added a 6-inch backsplash. We removed the cabinet over the sink, replaced the corroded faucet, and painted the walls, trim, and cabinets a nice clean white.

Who did the work: I did some of the work myself

Cost: $500 to $1000

Vintage Look Bath: Before

Who: Melissa B.

Where: Hapeville, GA

Our 1940s house had a bad bathroom on the main floor. The color was a horrible green, and there wasn't one but TWO layers of laminate over a gorgeous original marble tile floor (which sadly, we could not save).

Vintage Look Bath: After

Who: Melissa B.

Where: Hapeville, GA

We gutted the whole room, put in a new bathtub, new ceiling and walls, subway tile in the bath, tile floors, new fixtures, new trim around the windows and doors, and a ceiling fan light. Overall, we "updated" the bath to look more like it should in a house built in the 40s!

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $1,000 to $5,000

Sophisticated Kid Bath: Before

Who: Jana S.

Where: Mason, OH

This bathroom is the kids' bathroom. We knew we wanted something bright and fun that the kids could grow into. The purple walls and dark wood vanity were tasteless and too "grown-up."

Sophisticated Kid Bath: Before

Who: Jana S.

Where: Mason, OH

We used the existing countertop and cabinets to keep the price of the project down. We painted the cabinets a complimentary color of the new curtain. We used bead board and upgraded moldings to give it a more sophisticated look. We found a clearance stone for the floor, and my husband did all the work!

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $100 to $500

1930s Bath Upgrade: Before

Who: Peter H.

Where: Medford, OR

This is the main bathroom in our 1937 home. It was very outdated and neglected, complete with pink tiles in the shower that had been painted a yellow color that was now peeling, uneven flooring that cased the toilet to be on a slant, cabinets that were unusable due to the years of dirt and grime that were built up in them, cracks in the plaster walls and ceiling, and leaky plumbing.

1930s Bath Upgrade: After

Who: Peter H.

Where: Medford, OR

The new shower has crisp, white subway tiles and a raised shower head. The white wainscoting on the walls goes nicely with the age of the house, and the new toilet and sink also fit with the character of the home. The only item we kept was the deep cast iron tub that was still in very good shape.

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $1,000 to $5,000

Master Bath Fit for Two: Before

Who: Ashley M.

Where: Greenville, SC

Our master bath was tiny, uncomfortable, and very outdated. Luckily, there was a large walk-in closet next to the bathroom that we didn't really need, so we tore down the wall between the bath and closet and made a roomy master bath.

Master Bath Fit for Two: After

Who: Ashley M.

Where: Greenville, SC

We moved the entry door, closed off the old closet door, and put in a new wall to divide the sink and tub area from the toilet and shower area. We installed new tile on the floor and walls and built a large, two-person shower. We had the tub refinished, purchased new sinks, a toilet, and lighting.

Who did the work: I did some of the work myself

Cost: $5,000 to $10,000

Pretty Redo Under 3K: Before

Who: Chris S.

Where: Orlando, FL

I started with a '50s pink and green tile and an old eroded tub. The tile floor and vanity were removed all the way to the sub floor. The remaining tile was patched and prepped to receive a catalyzed paint.

Pretty Redo Under 3K: After

Who: Chris S.

Where: Orlando, FL

We laid a new polished ceramic tile floor was laid and framed out and plastered in wall openings. The room and tub were shot with glossy white to match the new vitreous china toilet. New cabinets and fixtures were installed, and the room was painted a semi-gloss soft greenish gray. Everything was done for under $3,000.

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $1,000 to $5,000

Clean and Modern Meets Victorian: Before

Who: Heather C.

Where: Philadelphia, PA

We live in a 1906 Victorian. Sometime in the mid '70s, a section of the second floor landing was walled in to create a master bath and closet. By the time we bought the house, the fixtures were rusting, and a previous owner had painted the wall tile! The best feature of the room was a beautiful stained glass window, but it was so leaky with cold air in winter that the curtains blew. The other problem was you had to walk through the closet to get to the bathroom.

Clean and Modern Meets Victorian: After

Who: Heather C.

Where: Philadelphia, PA

With the help of a friend, we made a plan that expanded the bathroom into the former closet giving us a lot more room. The space remains only five feet wide so we decided against a tub in favor of an enclosed shower. Most of the house has a lot of period detail, but other than the window, there was nothing in this space to salvage. It was liberating to be able to create a clean, modern space in our Victorian house. We made some nods to the past with subway tile, penny rounds, and a beadboard storage bench but selected modern fixtures and a double flush toilet!

Who did the work: I did some of the work myself

Cost: $10,000 to $25,000

Bath Opens Up for Better Flow: Before

Who: Paula R.

Where: Cincinnati, OH

My plan for a quick redo of my main bathroom turned into a full rehab. It was tiny, dull, and lacking in terms of storage and charm.

Bath Opens Up for Better Flow: After

Who: Paula R.

Where: Cincinnati, OH

I kept finding things I wanted to change so I took the bathroom down to the studs, moved the plumbing, and raised the ceiling by removing the collar ties. I installed hardwood floors and a claw foot tub to keep in tune with the cottage feel of the house. I had 25 square feet of floor space and now I have 79 square feet. Due to the slope of the ceilings, I had very little design flexibility, but I LOVE the finished product.

Who did the work: I did some of the work myself

Cost: $10,000 to $25,000

Combo Laundry Bath: Before

Who: Jennifer M.

Where: Lafayette, LA

Our 1887 is a lovely two-story house that has only had 2 previous owners. The 2nd, and longest, had the house moved to it's location in the early 1900's and had to add a kitchen and bath, which was last renovated in 1960's. We knew that the bathroom needed to be renovated but the house had more urgent matters to deal with first.

Combo Laundry Bath: After

Who: Jennifer M.

Where: Lafayette, LA

We gutted the 7-by-10-foot bath. We had to rebuild the sloping floors, had insulation blown in, ran plumbing, electrical, and started closing in the walls. The color scheme started with the washer/dryer (they're red). Then I found Mexican tile with the colors that we liked most for the shower, put beadboard on the ceiling, oak on the floor (to flow smoothly with the adjacent room), paint, new cabinets, and fixtures.

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $5,000 to $10,000

Craftsman Bath Brought Up to Speed: Before

Who: Michelle R.

Where: Durham, NC

I purchased my 1935 Craftsman bungalow in 2008. It was pretty neglected and was non-livable. The first project was the only bathroom, as vandals has stolen the copper plumbing, and there was no water to the house. It seriously needed to be completely gutted.

Craftsman Bath Brought Up to Speed: After

Who: Michelle R.

Where: Durham, NC

My house is historic so I had every intention of bringing back the vintage charm of the house. With an elegant pedestal sink, two-toned wainscoting, hexagonal floor tile, and a cream subway-tiled shower, I accomplished just that.

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $1,000 to $5,000

A Bath with A View: Before

Who: Bette M.

Where: Forest Lake, MN

This main floor bath in my 1914 home was very ugly. But I loved the view to the perennial garden. So I designed the new bath with a garden theme.

A Bath with A View: After

Who: Bette M.

Where: Forest Lake, MN

I found a lovely vintage washstand. Then I went searching for the perfect faucet and sink. I mounted a custom-made large mirror with a frame to match the marble tiles; it beautifully reflects the outside garden. I decided that I would rather have a beautiful curbless shower and no tub, as I already have a full bath on the second floor. I did the design myself and made sure everything would fit the space. I chose all of the materials, but I had professionals do all of the tear out and installation.

Who did the work: A contractor did all the work

Cost: $25,000 to $50,000

Spacious Oasis: Before

Who: Brooke R.

Where: Waterloo, IA

As you can see from the photos, our downstairs bathroom needed to be updated 20 years ago. My wife gets all the credit for the planning and design work and I just did what she told me to do. The corner fiberglass shower, stapled ceiling tile, old vanity, wood panel walls (painted mint green), and the floor tile were all torn out.

Spacious Oasis: After

Who: Brooke R.

Where: Waterloo, IA

The plumbing was moved to the wall. The shower was framed, and a bench, an inlay shelf, and a trip board were all built. New tile was installed in the shower and floor. The walls were painted with a faux finish. To save money, we ended up using the existing toilet because it was still in good shape. A tile sculpture, built from leftover shower tiles, hangs on the wall and completes our new bathroom. Considering the limited space, the pedestal sink, glass shower wall, and the diamond design of the shower make the room look and feel like it is bigger.

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $1,000 to $5,000

Upstairs Bath Carved From Room: Before

Who: Charles C.

Where: Webster Groves, MO

The second floor of our one-and-a-half story 1936 home was converted to living space decades ago. With only one bathroom in the house, we decided to add a second to the under-utilized upstairs. Unfortunately, it required routing all the utilities from the basement to the second story.

Upstairs Bath Carved From Room: After

Bathroom with light and oval mirror above sink.

Who: Charles C.

Where: Webster Groves, MO

It took over ten months of weekends and evenings, but we are very satisfied with the results. We wanted to keep with the styling of the rest of the house, so we chose classic tiles and fixtures to match. I even got a chance to build my own vanity out of mahogany. My wife's favorite parts are the custom stained glass transom lights, which she designed herself, and the heated floor. I enjoy the shower head that is much taller than I am, at about 7' high.

Who did the work: I did all the work myself

Cost: $5,000 to $10,000

Tiled Bath With Clean Lines: Before

Who: Dyan R.

Where: Bend, OR

My home is a 1923 bungalow, and the bathroom hadn't been remodeled since the 1960s or '70s.The bathroom was completely gutted to the studs, and all new plumbing and electrical was installed. To maximize the space the original five panel door was removed and made into a barn door. This made it possible to move the sink to the center of the cabinet instead of off to the side of the toilet.

Tiled Bath With Clean Lines: After

Who: Dyan R.

Where: Bend, OR

We installed electrical outlets inside the top cabinets, keeping cords hidden and the vanity clear. The original fir floors were stripped of three layers of linoleum and stained a chocolate brown. Glass accent tiles were paired with subway tiles in the shower and granite tile on the vanity. A vintage silk parachute is used as a shower curtain to accommodate the nine foot ceilings.

Who did the work: A contractor did all the work

Cost: $10,000 to $25,000

Complete Master Bath Redo: Before

Who: Ken M.

Where: San Francisco, CA

We have a 124-year-old Victorian cottage in San Francisco. Our bathroom is fairly small, so we had to work in the existing space.

Complete Master Bath Redo: After

Who: Ken M.

Where: San Francisco, CA

We moved a toilet, making a fully enclosed larger shower with a dual shower head. We used honed statuary carrara marble subway tiles. We added another sink to have a dual lavatory. The cabinet was custom made to fit the space, maximizing storage. The counter top is a polished statuary carrara marble. The flooring is a beautiful wicker basket weave mosaic marble tile.

Who did the work: A contractor did all the work

Cost: $25,000 to $50,000