clock menu more-arrow no yes

Interior Shutters

Most interior shutters sold today are variations on the louver style. But there are other designs, including ones with woven inserts or old-fashioned solid panels

Paneled

Photo by Kolin Smith

Traditional-looking folders like these trace their history to classic house styles, like Federal or Greek Revival.

Philadelphia Federal, from Kestrel DIY Shutters, starting at $170 a pair (for an 18-by-24 in. window).

Arched

Photo by Kolin Smith

Because shutters are custom-ordered, nearly any window shape can be accommodated, as shown with this curve-topped set.

Plantation quarter-round, from Kestrel DIY Shutters, starting at $630 per pair (for an 18-by-24-in. window).

Woven Inserts

Photo by Kolin Smith

The panels of some shutters are made of woven bamboo or wood strips, which offer a shadelike effect—though instead of rolling open, they swing out.

Dianchi full-fill shutters, from Smith and Noble, $23 per sq. ft.

Louvered

Photo by Kolin Smith

The most popular kind of shutter includes moveable louvers, which allow control over light and air infiltration.

Heritance hardwood, from Hunter Douglas, starting at $245 a pair (for an 18-by-24-in. window).

Combination

Photo by Kolin Smith

Shutters with both louvers and weaves are best when privacy is an issue. While one half can be opened to admit a breeze, the other keeps out prying eyes.

2 1/2-inch louvered shutter with Dianchi half-fill, from Smith and Noble, $23 per sq. ft.

Vinyl

Photo by Kolin Smith

Vinyl shutters won't warp the way wood can, though they come only in shades of white. (Most wood shutters can be ordered unfinished, stained, or painted.)

Palm Beach Custom Shutters, from Hunter Douglas, starting at $100 per pair (for an 18-by-24-in. window).