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Quick Guide to Brick Path Patterns

Are you trying to decide which brick pattern to lay? Read on to see which patterns are easy to arrange, how many cuts you'll make, and what will—or won't—work with a curve.

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Choosing the right pattern to suit the shape of your brick walkway (and your skill level) can drastically reduce your work time.

Popular Brick Patterns to Consider

Running Bond Pattern

Photo by Don Penny/Time Inc. digital Studio

Bricks are butted end to end with joints that fall in the middle of the brick on the next row. One of the sturdiest and easiest patterns to install, running bond only requires minimal cutting at each end and will easily follow a gentle curve.

Basket Weave Pattern

Photo by Don Penny/Time Inc. digital Studio

Pairs of bricks alternate to create a woven appearance. On a straight path, this pattern only requires cutting to fit at each end, but on a curve you may have fanning gaps, requiring you to put in extra time with a chisel or saw.

Herringbone

Photo by Don Penny/Time Inc. digital Studio

This zigzag pattern creates a formal look that can be adapted to a slight curve. But it requires several cuts along the perimeter.

Spanish Bond

Photo by Don Penny/Time Inc. digital Studio

Four outer bricks form a square that encases a half-brick to cover 1 square foot. Since the outer square must make 90-degree angles to fit the half-brick, the pattern is difficult to adapt to a curve.

Diagonal

Photo by Don Penny/Time Inc. digital Studio

Turning the running bond on a 45-degree angle will accentuate a curve nicely and may look simple to put down, but every interior brick that abuts the edging will need to be custom-cut to fit.

Diagonal Basket Weave

Photo by Don Penny/Time Inc. digital Studio

Turning the squares of a basket weave 45 degrees adds visual depth and will round a curve nicely but requires a lot of custom cutting along the perimeter.