fix rotted wood trim
Steps // How to Replace Rot-Damaged Trim
1 ×

Remove the Cap

 
Step One // How to Replace Rot-Damaged Trim

Remove the Cap

rotted wood
Photo by Brian Wilder

After slicing through the old caulk around the plinth (to avoid damaging the adjacent trim), Vietri pries off the cap molding and levers the plinth free. Its water-blackened backside shows how extensively moisture penetrated this assembly.

 
2 ×

Install Flashing

 
Step Two // How to Replace Rot-Damaged Trim

Install Flashing

strips of sheet-lead flashing
Photo by Brian Wilder

Vietri protects the framing with overlapping strips of sheet-lead flashing. (Copper or waterproofing membrane also work.) Then he protects all the exposed edges of the old trim with a coat of oil-based primer.

 
3 ×

Apply Adhesive to Trim Edges

 
Step Three // How to Replace Rot-Damaged Trim

Apply Adhesive to Trim Edges

polyurethane construction adhesive
Photo by Brian Wilder

When the primer dries, Vietri squeezes a bead of polyurethane construction adhesive over the edges of the old wood trim. He immediately beds the new plinth's mitered side pieces into the goop, which is both strong and waterproof.

 
4 ×

Install New Cap

 
Step Four // How to Replace Rot-Damaged Trim

Install New Cap

PVC-solvent-based cement
Photo by Brian Wilder

A PVC-solvent-based cement bonds the mitered pieces of the new plinth to each other and makes the joints waterproof. Vietri also fastens the pieces together with stainless steel trim-head screws. Dabs of acrylic glazing putty hide the screw heads.

 
5 ×

Prep for Paint

 
Step Five // How to Replace Rot-Damaged Trim

Prep for Paint

Photo by Brian Wilder

A light sanding with 220-grit paper readies the plinth for a coat of acrylic-based primer and two coats of acrylic paint. The paint blends the repair with the rest of the trim, but it isn't needed to protect the PVC from the sun.

 

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