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camaroguy
sagging wall insulation

Is there any way to repair sagging wall insulation.

bsum1
Re: sagging wall insulation

How do you know it's sagging?

Ernie_Fergler
Re: sagging wall insulation
bsum1 wrote:

How do you know it's sagging?

I was wondering that very same thing.
Great minds think alike.

Timothy Miller
Re: sagging wall insulation

Howdy turn the house upside down and shake it real hard. Hope it made you laugh. Is it cellulose?

camaroguy
Re: sagging wall insulation

during a energy audit in 2008. The energy contracter while using a infared camara showed us the sagging or poorly installed bat insulation on our exterior walls, Also the poorly framed windows. Our house was the first one the building contracter had built. The poor frameing quality and lack of detail can not be seen from the outside. It is when it gets cold outside and the wind starts to blow that the lack of quality really comes through.

Timothy Miller
Re: sagging wall insulation

Howdy you could blow in some cellulose which will require hole repairs in the walls or adding wall trim.

Ernie_Fergler
Re: sagging wall insulation
Timothy Miller wrote:

Howdy you could blow in some cellulose which will require hole repairs in the walls or adding wall trim.

Sounds like a great plan. You might think about drilling holes and then spray foaming said voids.

camaroguy
Re: sagging wall insulation

If you blow insulation in won"t you lose your vapor barrier?

canuk
Re: sagging wall insulation

I don't think the infrared scan revealed sagging insulation so much as compressed and / or gaps ---- regardless it showed the insulation wasn't correctly installed.

Hard to say if blowing cellulose into the wall cavities is the answer. By blowing in cellulose it would compress the existing batts which negates it's function.
Batt insulation relies on the air space within it's construction to be able to perform it's function --- that's why it should always be puffy and not compressed when installed.

Blowing in insulation will compress the batts which means the batts will have almost no R value to contribute. The compressed batts would take up space reducing the volume within the stud cavity not allowing a desirable amount of blown in insulation ---- you may end up with less R value.

This might leave one of 3 options ......

- remove the interior drywall and correct the existing insulation and vapour barrier.

or ....

- apply rigid foam to the exterior of the home

or ....

apply rigid foam to the interior walls

2 cents worth.

RJordan
Re: sagging wall insulation

You need to do what is called dense pack cellulose. It involves inserting a small diameter hose, like a 1 inch diameter attached to the 2 inch diameter hose from the machine, all the way into the wall. What you are looking for is dense packed cellulose to stop air movement. Yes, you lose R-value by compressing either the fibeglass or cellulose, but it is more important to stop air movement. Not every contractor can or will do this, so it is important to ask and make sure.

camaroguy
Re: sagging wall insulation

Thanks for the reply. That is something I had not thought of.

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