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tgm1024
About burning pressure treated wood

Ok, before anyone freaks out over this, hear me out. This scientifically bugs me.

First: My instinct and knowledge of physics tell me that burning PT is probably a pretty bad idea. Further, there is no way I'm going to even try it, nor do I want "permission" to do so.

HOWEVER-----ALL the advice and warning on this that I can find is based largely on hearsay as far as I can tell. Every article datum or quote either remains unattributed or cites something else that also tries to connect dots from the substance toxicity to burning causing particulate inhalation, etc., without testing. EVEN GOVERNMENT SITES warn against it but show not even 1 study that confirms it.

There must be something that says something that can establish clear causality. I really don't like word-of-mouth information, regardless of how sensible it seems.

Anyone know of anything? Don't just look at first layer google results---if you dig in them you'll eventually see just vapor. No pun intended.

Thanks

dj1
Re: About burning pressure treated wood

If it's questionable I wouldn't burn PT lumber at home. Why would you?

Many folks jumped Niagra falls in a container, some even survived. Would you do it?

jkirk
Re: About burning pressure treated wood

ok.. my neighbor did this once... he was 16 down at his cottage.. his neighbor there asked him to tear teh deck off the place which he did... then gave him a can of gas to burn at the back of the property.... which he did.. needless to say black smoke was billowing off the bonfire and several people saw it then called the fire department.. some of the surrounding trees didnt repsond to well to the black smoke either

does this count

tgm1024
Re: About burning pressure treated wood
dj1 wrote:

If it's questionable I wouldn't burn PT lumber at home. Why would you?

Many folks jumped Niagra falls in a container, some even survived. Would you do it?

You're not paying attention. Please re-read my post. I'm not saying I would, nor am I saying it's not questionable. Of course it's questionable. And I already said I would not do it.

tgm1024
Re: About burning pressure treated wood
jkirk wrote:

ok.. my neighbor did this once... he was 16 down at his cottage.. his neighbor there asked him to tear teh deck off the place which he did... then gave him a can of gas to burn at the back of the property.... which he did.. needless to say black smoke was billowing off the bonfire and several people saw it then called the fire department.. some of the surrounding trees didnt repsond to well to the black smoke either

does this count

Thanks for that, but no. Black smoke does not speak for itself as a danger. I think if you look this up, you'll discover that there really is nothing resembling straight out causality here. It's bothersome to have people (not you) speak with absolute authority on something that is only authoritative because of someone else speaking with authority. I need to see something /under/ it. I'll be glad to accept that it's because I didn't search hard enough, but the warnings I find just reference other warnings. That's NOT good enough.

My own understanding of things is good enough to not risk assuming a toxin is fully denatured by fire, but that's not good enough for speaking of it being a danger as factual result.

The entire reason I bring this up is that it's interesting that something so universally held as true doesn't have glaring studies left right up and down showing it to be true. That's not right.

keith3267
Re: About burning pressure treated wood

PT wood used to contain arsenic. If you burned it, the arsenic would be released into the environment. In theory, if the arsenic build up is high enough, it could be absorbed by plants and get into the food chain.

New PT wood does not contain arsenic.

jkirk
Re: About burning pressure treated wood

so why are you so concerned about such a thing... pt is full of chemicals..its proven.. the new stuff isnt as bad as the older type. which is proven

the late larry haun a legendary carpenter who published countless articles along with several books for the taunton press died last month of cancer. he is certain that a good reason for his cancer is do to years of handling lumber that was dripping with arsenic.. now imagine this stuff burning what is released into the air and those surrounding it...

dj1
Re: About burning pressure treated wood

I ain't a philosopher or a chemist, but I went to some deep thought about what you are saying.

So, as I understand it, you reject it when someone tells you "you don't do this, because it's toxic" when he doesn't have any proof to back up his words. OK, I can accept that.

Now if you could only use your energy for something as positive as leading the 99% of the middle class to acheive some condtructive goals and to make some social justice, instead of insisting that burning PT is not proven toxic, we'll all have a better country.

Young man (only my assumption), don't let anybody near you burn PT lumber.

canuk
Re: About burning pressure treated wood

tgm1024 -- I hear what you are saying.

However, a certain amount of faith has to be taken from simple warnings -- also some common sense along with your own knowledge.
I don't know if there are actual scientific tests showing drinking gasoline will cause extreme illness or death ( perhaps there are though I can't be bothered to look ) --- but , common sense along with some faith from warnings --- I for one believe it wouldn't be a good idea.

tgm1024
Re: About burning pressure treated wood
canuk wrote:

tgm1024 -- I hear what you are saying.

However, a certain amount of faith has to be taken from simple warnings -- also some common sense along with your own knowledge.
I don't know if there are actual scientific tests showing drinking gasoline will cause extreme illness or death ( perhaps there are though I can't be bothered to look ) --- but , common sense along with some faith from warnings --- I for one believe it wouldn't be a good idea.

Yes, that's indeed true about the common sense. Hence the reason I stated I would never do it.

I dont think that drinking gasoline is not an applicable analogy. It would be like saying that there is no evidence about the damage from sticking plastic toothpicks in your eyes as opposed to wooden ones. In the gasoline case, direct ingestion of such things have specific reactions. In fact I remember reading of such things as a kid from a doctor of an Emergency Room because of the then energy crisis. The question with the PT is 1. is anything released, or consumed, 2. is it inhaled/coating you or otherwise in contact with you dangerously, and 3. has the toxin been denatured anyway if so. For my counter broken analogy, punctured globes are commonly understood, regardless.

In life we are warned about the problem of CO emissions.....these HAVE caused deaths and there have been several attempts to address it (detectors, warning about burning things indoors, etc.) We understand the results of smoking. We even know with clinical certainty the results of various amounts of heat in direct contact with skin ("don't touch a hot stove" is more than common sense).

BUT.....I don't see anything substantive about burning pressure treated wood anywhere. And I am searching for something.

tgm1024
Re: About burning pressure treated wood
dj1 wrote:

I ain't a philosopher or a chemist, but I went to some deep thought about what you are saying.

So, as I understand it, you reject it when someone tells you "you don't do this, because it's toxic" when he doesn't have any proof to back up his words. OK, I can accept that.

Don't bother accepting that.

You didn't go into deep enough thought if you squeezed that out of what I said. I haven't "reject"ed anything. Questioning why there is no evidence for a commonly held strong recommendation is hardly rejection. Rejection is outright believing that something is false. I am searching for information, and am not comfortable with such strong belief systems based only on word of mouth. At least I can't find anything solid. Can you?

Seems to me in my life I've seen a bit too much common knowledge later prove to be mythic in nature.

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