clock menu more-arrow no yes

Hard Fescue (Festuca ovina)

Photo by Webb Chappell

•Cool-season grass (Northern states)

•Fine and slow-growing

•Works well in shade or drought

•Stands up to wear

Tall Fescue (Festuca arundinacea)

Photo by Webb Chappell

•Cool-season grass (Northern states)

•Coarse, but looks good

•Needs light but doesn't need to be mowed often

Red Fescue (Festuca rubra)

Photo by Webb Chappell

•Cool-season grass (Northern states)

•Very fine texture

•Works well in poor, acidic soil

•Stands up to mild drought and also thrives in cool, wet regions, as in the Northwest.

Kentucky Bluegrass (Poa pratensis)

Photo by Webb Chappell

•Cool-season grass (Northern states)

•Thin, richly colored, and durable

•Tolerates cold and heat, but needs a lot of sun and fertilizer

•Good for most climates

Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne)

Photo by Webb Chappell

•Warm-season grass (Southern and Western states)

•The bulk of most mixes for colder climates

•Tough and lush

•Good instant-lawn seed

Buffalo Grass (Buchloe dactyloides)

Photo by Webb Chappell

•Warm-season grass (Southern states)

•Low maintenance

•Good for alkaline clay soils

•Goes dormant in summer and autumn.

Centipedegrass (Eremochloa ophiuroides)

Photo by Webb Chappell

•Warm-season grass (Southern and Western states)

•Coarse

•Light to medium in color

•Very slow-growing, so takes a while to start up but requires little maintenance

Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum)

Photo by Webb Chappell

•Warm-season grass (Southern and Western states)

•Slow-growing and coarse

•Staves off weeds

•Good in sandy soil