How to Make a Hypertufa Table

This rugged stuff can weather spilled drinks, sticky hands, and even harsh winters. Use it to make a versatile outdoor table that will last for years

Photo by Wendell T. Webber

If you've never heard of hypertufa, let us explain why this concrete look-alike is the perfect material for an outdoor table. Made from a mix of cement, peat moss, and perlite, hypertufa has much of concrete's strength and durability, but it weighs a lot less, doesn't require sealing, and has a more textured, organic appearance. Senior technical editor Mark Powers cast a tabletop with a recess for adding easy-care sedum and designed a notched cedar base that can be taken apart and stored flat. Hypertufa requires a few weeks to cure, so get started now and you'll be able to show off your handsome new table before summer draws to a close.

Download a cut list to build this hypertufa table.


Steps // How to Make a Hypertufa Table
1 ×

Overview for Making a Hypertufa Table

 
Step One // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Overview for Making a Hypertufa Table

illustration of how to build a hypertufa table
Illustration by Gregory Nemec

CUT LIST:

You can use the cut list below or Download a cut list to build this hypertufa table here.

1x2 legs: 4 @ 14 inches
1x2 upper support blocks: 4 @ 11 inches
1x2 lower support blocks: 4 @ 3 inches
1x4 form frame, short sides (scrap): 2 @ 28 inches
1x4 form frame, long sides (scrap): 2 @ 30 inches
1x4 reinforcement blocks: 4 @ 3 inches
¾-inch rigid-foam insulation: 1@ 20 by 30 inches
¾-inch rigid-foam insulation: 2 @ 7 by 14 inches
1x4 lower crosspieces: 2 @ 10 inches
1x4 upper crosspieces: 2 @ 21 inches*
1x4 lower stretcher: 1 @ 31 inches*
1x4 upper stretchers 2 @ 31 inches*

*After they're cut to length, miter the ends of the upper crosspieces and all three stretchers at opposing 45-degree angles, and clip 1 inch off the long points of the ends. For each piece, the longer edge will be the top edge.

Notch cut instructions:

All notch cuts are ¾ inch wide and extend to half the width of the board, or 1¾ inches. Always measure the positions for the notches along the top (long) edge for each piece, no matter which edge the notches are cut on. See diagrams for positioning and sizing.

For each 1x4 lower crosspiece:
The notch should be centered on one edge of the board; the notched edge is the top edge and will face up during assembly.

For each 1x4 upper crosspiece:
Cut notches on the top (long) edge. Position the notches 3 inches from each end, measured along the top (long) edge. The notches will face up during assembly.

For the 1x4 lower stretcher:
Cut notches on the bottom (short) edge. Position the notches 4 inches from each end, measured along the top (long) edge. The notches will face down during assembly.

For each 1x4 upper stretcher:
Cut notches on the bottom (short) edge. Position the notches 3 inches from each end, measured along the top (long) edge. The notches will face down during assembly.

Project timeline:

Prep Day: Cut and assemble the form (Steps 1 through 5).
Saturday: Make the hypertufa mix and cast the tabletop
(Steps 6 through 10). Wait a few weeks for the tabletop to cure.
Sunday: Assemble the base and set the tabletop on it (Steps 11 through 18).

 
2 ×

Cut the Pieces for the Form

 
Step Two // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Cut the Pieces for the Form

Mark Powers cuts pieces for a hypertufa table with a miter saw
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Refer to the cut list. Use a miter saw to cut scrap 1x4s into long sides, short sides, and reinforcing blocks.

 
3 ×

Screw the Form Together

 
Step Three // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Screw the Form Together

Mark Powers fastens pieces for a hypertufa table with a drill/driver
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Place two reinforcing blocks flush with the ends of each long side. Secure them by driving 1 inch screws through the blocks and into the long sides. Sandwich the long sides between the short sides, with the blocks facing outward, as shown; the ends of the short sides extend past the blocks so that the form can be pulled apart easily when the tabletop has cured. Mark locations for pilot holes on the tops of the short sides and the edges of the blocks. Drill 1/16-inch pilot holes through these marks. Secure the form by driving 1 inch screws through the pilot holes.

Tip: You can make the tabletop longer or wider than ours, but doing so may require adding extra stretchers or crosspieces to the base for support.

 
4 ×

Cut the Foam to Size

 
Step Four // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Cut the Foam to Size

Mark Powers cuts foam for hypertufa table insulation with a utility knife
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Use a utility knife to cut a piece of ¾-inch rigid-foam insulation to fit snugly inside the form. Press the foam into place until it sits on the work surface, flush with the form's bottom.

 
5 ×

Make a Platform for the Recess

 
Step Five // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Make a Platform for the Recess

Mark Powers fastens a foam piece for the recessed area of a hypertufa table
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Cut two pieces of foam to the desired size of the recess for the planter. Stack them on top of each other, center them atop the large piece, and sink 2-inch deck screws through all three layers to secure them.

 
6 ×

Cut the Wire Mesh

 
Step Six // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Cut the Wire Mesh

Mark Powers cuts wire mesh for the recessed area of a hypertufa table
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Wearing protective gloves, use wire snips to cut a piece of hardware cloth to fit inside the form. In its center, cut out a rectangle that's 1 inch shorter on all sides than the platform you made in Step 4, and set aside the cutout for Step 8. Snip the corners of the cutout area so that you can bend the edges upward around the platform, as shown. 
Set aside this piece of wire mesh for Step 9.

 
7 ×

Combine the Dry Ingredients

 
Step Seven // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Combine the Dry Ingredients

Mark Powers mixes the dry ingredients of the hypertufa together
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Wearing a dust mask, put 12 quarts each of cement, peat moss, and perlite into a mixing tub. Use a hoe to combine the ingredients thoroughly.

 
8 ×

Add Water to Make the Mix

 
Step Eight // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Add Water to Make the Mix

Mark Powers adds water to the hypertufa mix
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Add a few cupfuls of water to the dry ingredients and use a hoe to blend it in. Continue adding water in small quantities and blending it in until the mix reaches the consistency of creamy peanut butter. If the table will be left outside year-round, add a small amount of acrylic fortifier to the mix, according to the manufacturer's instructions, to prevent the tabletop from cracking.

 
9 ×

Fill the Form Halfway

 
Step Nine // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Fill the Form Halfway

Mark Powers fills the table frame with the hypertufa mix
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Coat the form's interior with petroleum jelly or cooking spray so that the tabletop can be easily removed later. Add hypertufa mix until the form is filled halfway. As you work, use a scrap block to level the mix, and tap the form with a hammer to get rid of air bubbles.

 
10 ×

Place the Wire Mesh

 
Step Ten // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Place the Wire Mesh

Mark Powers places wire mesh on top of the curing hypertufa mix
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Lay the large piece of wire mesh on top of the mix so that the edges around the platform are bent upward. Add mix until the platform is covered by no more than 
¼ inch. Lay the wire mesh cutout on top of the mix, over the platform.

 
11 ×

Finish Filling the Form

 
Step Eleven // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Finish Filling the Form

Mark Powers fills the rest of the table frame with the curing hypertufa mix
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Add mix to the form until the mix is flush with the top, again leveling it and getting rid of air bubbles as you work. Cover the form with plastic to retain moisture for a slow, steady cure. Let the tabletop cure for a few weeks.

 
12 ×

Cut and Miter the Boards

 
Step Twelve // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Cut and Miter the Boards

Mark Powers cuts boards to use for the structure for the hypertufa table with a miter saw
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Refer to the cut list. Cut cedar 1x2s to size for legs and support blocks, and cedar 1x4s to size for crosspieces and stretchers. Use a miter saw to cut the ends of the stretchers and upper crosspieces at opposing 45-degree angles, and clip 1 inch off the long points of each.

 
13 ×

Cut Out the Notches

 
Step Thirteen // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Cut Out the Notches

Mark Powers cuts notches into the crosspiece boards for the structure of the hypertufa table with a jigsaw
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Refer to the overview diagram. You'll cut notches on the bottom (short) edges of the stretchers and on the top (long) edges of the crosspieces. Each notch will be ¾ inch wide and will extend to half the width of the board, or 1¾ inches. (See the cut list.) Mark the notches with a scrap 1 block turned on edge, and make the cuts with a jigsaw.

Tip: Use a pencil to label the top edge of the crosspieces and the bottom edge of the stretchers so that you'll know what edges to cut the notches on.

 
14 ×

Dry-Fit the Sides

 
Step Fourteen // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Dry-Fit the Sides

Mark Powers dry-fits the pieces of the hypertufa table together
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Place an upper crosspiece on a work surface, notches facing upward. Place two legs below it with their tops abutting the crosspiece, and align the outer edges of the legs with the inner edges of the notches. Lay upper support blocks onto the upper crosspiece and legs so that they're flush at the top and fall between the notches. Lay a lower crosspiece onto the legs with the notch facing upward, abutting the upper support blocks and flush with the legs' outer edges. Lay lower support blocks onto the legs, abutting the lower crosspiece and flush with the legs' bottoms. Repeat for the second side.

Tip: The pieces of the base should fit snugly, but if the notches are 
a bit tight, use a wood file or a narrow piece of scrap wrapped in sandpaper to enlarge them.

 
15 ×

Assemble the Sides

 
Step Fifteen // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Assemble the Sides

Mark Powers fastens the sides of the hypertufa table together with a pneumatic nail gun
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

One by one, lift each piece that's on top, apply polyurethane glue to its back, and set it back in place. Tack the pieces together using a pneumatic nail gun and 1-inch brad nails. Repeat for the second side.

 
16 ×

Fit the Base Together

 
Step Sixteen // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Fit the Base Together

Mark Powers places the stretchers over the notches of the hypertufa table crosspieces
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Stand the sides upright with the lower crosspieces facing each other. Fit the stretchers into the notches on the crosspieces.

 
17 ×

Remove the Form

 
Step Seventeen // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Remove the Form

Mark Powers removes the frame for the hypertufa tabletop
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Flip the form over and place it on a work surface, foam facing up. Use a drill/driver to remove the screws. Push on the tail ends of the form's short sides to tilt them down and away from the tabletop. Pull off the long sides and remove the foam.

Tip: If foam still sticks to the tabletop after it has cured, slip a razor blade under the edges of each piece and pry it off bit by bit.

 
18 ×

Smooth the Edges and Surfaces

 
Step Eighteen // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Smooth the Edges and Surfaces

Mark Powers runs a scrap block of wood over hypertufa tabletop to soften rough spots and scrape away leftover foam
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Run a scrap block of wood over the edges, corners, and surface of the tabletop to soften rough spots and scrape away any leftover foam.

 
19 ×

Position the Tabletop on the Base

 
Step Nineteen // How to Make a Hypertufa Table

Position the Tabletop on the Base

Mark Powers positions the hypertufa tabletop on top of the table frame
Photo by Wendell T. Webber

Center the tabletop on the base; its weight will hold it in place. If you like, add sedum or another plant that thrives in shallow soil to the recess. Over time, the tabletop will lighten in color, while the cedar base will weather to a handsome gray.

 
 
 

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