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CeliaP
taming mint plant
CeliaP

A couple of years ago in the fall I planted a mint plant (catnip maybe) on the slope in the very back of my yard. My back yard slopes down into a wooded area. We have lots of bugs and the mint was a way to help minimize the bugs a bit. Last year there was no sign of the plant. I thought that it may have died out in the very heavy snow that we had that winter. This spring it has come back with a vengeance. Somehow there is not much of the plant where I originally placed it but now it is in the middle of my back yard and it has migrated all the way to a cut our area in our front side yard. I admit that the cut out area (shared with a neighbor who basically trashed it) looks better with the mint (green foliage with purple flowers). I knew mint can quickly spread but I wasn't expecting it to jump 20 feet to the middle of the back yard and @ 100 feet to the front area. My guess is that some woodland creatures consumed the plant then made deposits around my yard - helping the plant spread so far. I actually don't mind the mint in the grass (scattered purple flowers in the grass) but I just don't want it taking over the grass completely in the back yard. I am willing to leave it in the cut out area because it's an improvement there. Looking for advice on how to keep the mint from over taking the grass in my back yard. Thanks.

C

A. Spruce
Re: taming mint plant
A. Spruce

Mint likes very wet, cool areas, it's fairly easy to kill with herbicides because it's a broad leaf, or, let it dry out really well and it will leave of its own accord.

ed21
Re: taming mint plant
ed21

Never known it to get loose in a yard, but its a pain in beds and runs pretty quickly. My daughter wanted to plant some for her rabbit, but I made her plant it in a container. With one of our coldest winters it still came back after sitting in the container outside. Tough stuff.

CeliaP
Re: taming mint plant
CeliaP
A. Spruce wrote:

Mint likes very wet, cool areas, it's fairly easy to kill with herbicides because it's a broad leaf, or, let it dry out really well and it will leave of its own accord.

GTK, I'll just leave it. We don't water our lawn in the summer so that may take care of the mint growing on the lawn. The cutout tends to be wet so the mint is probably there to stay. But like I said it's an improvement in that area so no big deal. Hey maybe it will cut back on the bugs in the area as well.

dj1
Re: taming mint plant
dj1

Funny, we tried growing mint in pots a few times...somebody ate them everytime, and it weren't us.

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