7 posts / 0 new
Last post
Helpee
How to repair cut floor joist

The bathtub suddenly sagged an inch when someone was taking a shower. I went into the crawl space and discovered that the builder had cut out a portion of the floor joist that ran lengthwise under the middle of tub in order to plumb the tub.

A carpenter recommended jacking up the joist, then using a piece of floor joist to make a T at the end of the cut, nailing it into the cut joist and the two intact joists on either side of the cut joist, then remove the jack. Obviously, do this to both cut ends of the joist. Is that going to work? Will that pass a building inspector's inspection?

dj1
Re: How to repair cut floor joist

It's amazing you haven't discovered it earlier.

A better way, IMHO, is to add a sister joist, the entire length of the cut joist, then nailing them together.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: How to repair cut floor joist

Adding a header as your friend suggested could be the best method. The inspector may or may not demand that you double the joists to either side. Sistering the cut member is fine unless it still interferes with the plumbing. You may need to figure out how to head off both ends of the cut, in which case that other header will probably interfere with the plumbing.
Casey

JLMCDANIEL
Re: How to repair cut floor joist

I agree with Sombreuil_mongrel and your carpenter. Putting in headers (the T) is your best choice and is commonly done when cutting openings for stairways, attic steps, etc. And yes it should pass inspection.

Jack

jkirk
Re: How to repair cut floor joist

all those methods work and are approved by inspectors

Helpee
Re: How to repair cut floor joist

Thanks, everyone. I'll get to work.

canuk
Re: How to repair cut floor joist
Helpee wrote:

The bathtub suddenly sagged an inch when someone was taking a shower. I went into the crawl space and discovered that the builder had cut out a portion of the floor joist that ran lengthwise under the middle of tub in order to plumb the tub.

A carpenter recommended jacking up the joist, then using a piece of floor joist to make a T at the end of the cut, nailing it into the cut joist and the two intact joists on either side of the cut joist, then remove the jack. Obviously, do this to both cut ends of the joist. Is that going to work? Will that pass a building inspector's inspection?

Perhaps --- though I'd suspect the use of joist hangers would also make things stronger and a thumbs up from the inspector. A lot depends on on floor framing layout. A single 2 by may not be enough for both the heading and trimmers.
If you can't sister on a full length joist then a second joist within 6 inches of the cut one ( with solid blocking ) would also definately pass an inspection.

By the way --- I doubt it was the builder that cut the joist --- more likely it was a butcher plumber when installing the tub.

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.