clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile

Save This Old House: Handsome Two-Story Greek Revival

This southern home on the National Register of Historic Places is primed for a forward-looking rehab

The History

Photo by courtesy of the Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation

Published September 2015

Price: $15,000

Location: Cokesbury, South Carolina

Contact: Michael Bedenbaugh, 803-924-9979

First named Mount Ariel, the village of Cokesbury was founded in 1824 as a Methodist outpost with visions of a utopian future. Sadly, that vision was short-lived, but 30 years later the community was revived with the founding of an all-female Masonic college. This house, built around that time, likely served as a residence for school faculty. Although the women's college was followed by a string of other area schools, there's no longer a college in the town. The property was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1970, and the house has been vacant since then.

Shown: A grand, full-height entry porch, typical of Greek Revival homes in the South, gives presence to the otherwise plain facade. The second-floor balcony is accessed through a set of double doors.

Why Save It?

Photo by courtesy of the Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation

The two-story bears the hallmark triangular pediment of the Greek Revival style, supported by square columns. A small balcony crowns double front doors, which have sidelights and a transom.

Shown: A small second-floor balcony overhangs the double front doors.

Historical Woodwork

Photo by courtesy of the Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation

Inside, simple but elegant molding adorns the six fireplaces, and stepped casings surround many of the doors and windows.

Shown: Three separate chimneys—two on the sides and one in the back—serve six fireplaces. Paneled mantels echo the charming no-frills style of the home.

What it Needs

Photo by courtesy of the Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation

The home had been updated with new plumbing and electrical, but those upgrades were torn out in a previous (unfinished) remodel and will have to be added. The basic structure is sound, and the roof is in good shape. Inside, most of the original heart-pine floors are in relatively good condition, though all need refinishing; the walls are beyond repair in parts.

Shown: Stepped molding around the front door matches casings inside the house.

Original Brick Chimney

Photo by courtesy of the Palmetto Trust for Historic Preservation

But this classical house nestled in a rural area an hour and a half from Columbia is primed for a forward-looking rehab—all it needs is the right owner to help usher it along.

Shown: Twin chimneys were built on either side of the house.