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Jort147
Redoing the Lawn

I'm pretty new to this but determined. I have a fairly large back yard full of weeds and very little grass. I want to start a new lawn from scratch. I borrowed a tiller from a friend and also purchased lawn killer. Will putting the lawn killer affect my new lawn from starting. What do i do now?

bp21901
Re: Redoing the Lawn

The lawn killer label should tell you how long to wait after application before rototilling and trying to plant your new grass seed.

A. Spruce
Re: Redoing the Lawn

Before applying any weed/lawn killer, keep in mind that these products ONLY kill the visible plant, it does not affect any seeds that are in the soil that will germinate once you rototill and amend the soil. In addition, the herbicides do stay in the soil for a prolonged period of time, regardless of what the manufacturers say. Roundup, for example, does not break down as claimed, remaining toxic to the environment for years.

My recommendation would be to mow and rake up any current vegetation. Once you break up the surface a little with the tiller you can rake out most of the active plant matter. From there, amend the soil with fresh manure or compost by applying 3 to 6 inches evenly across the surface, then tilling it to a depth of 6 inches or more. Grade and rake the area smooth, roll with a lawn roller and you're ready to spread grass seed or install sod. Use care in the tilling process not to damage any existing sprinkler lines. If you don't currently have a sprinkler system, now would be an excellent time to install one.

If you have more questions, fire away, we're glad to help. :cool:

Jort147
Re: Redoing the Lawn
A. Spruce wrote:

Before applying any weed/lawn killer, keep in mind that these products ONLY kill the visible plant, it does not affect any seeds that are in the soil that will germinate once you rototill and amend the soil. In addition, the herbicides do stay in the soil for a prolonged period of time, regardless of what the manufacturers say. Roundup, for example, does not break down as claimed, remaining toxic to the environment for years.

My recommendation would be to mow and rake up any current vegetation. Once you break up the surface a little with the tiller you can rake out most of the active plant matter. From there, amend the soil with fresh manure or compost by applying 3 to 6 inches evenly across the surface, then tilling it to a depth of 6 inches or more. Grade and rake the area smooth, roll with a lawn roller and you're ready to spread grass seed or install sod. Use care in the tilling process not to damage any existing sprinkler lines. If you don't currently have a sprinkler system, now would be an excellent time to install one.

If you have more questions, fire away, we're glad to help. :cool:

Thank you for the advice, I'll give that a try.

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