13 posts / 0 new
Last post
Lobo74
Radiator removal

I want to remove a radiator to fix a floor. Can I remove the feed and return lines w/o interrupting the rest of the system? I can turn off the valve on the feed but do I have to cap the return line? Thanks. Joe

johnjh2o
Re: Radiator removal

Joe you can't remove the radiator and keep the system running unless you cap the lines.

John

MLBSF
Re: Radiator removal

you have to drain the heating system, fix the floor then re-hook up the radiator and refill the heating system.

Brookworld
Re: Radiator removal

Is the piping in series so he can't use the system until he re-installs the radiator ?

johnjh2o
Re: Radiator removal
Brookworld wrote:

Is the piping in series so he can't use the system until he re-installs the radiator ?

I don't think so it sounds like it's a cast iron radiator. He said he had one valve on the feed. More then likely a one or two pipe system.

John

Lobo74
Re: Radiator removal

I think it is a 2 pipe system. I am basing that on the pipes that lead upstairs. Two pipes next to each other. I am guessing one is the feed and one is the return. Thanks for the responses. Joe

Brookworld
Re: Radiator removal
Lobo74 wrote:

I think it is a 2 pipe system. I am basing that on the pipes that lead upstairs. Two pipes next to each other. I am guessing one is the feed and one is the return. Thanks for the responses.

I'm no expert, but they all have a "return" pipe back to the boiler. I was asking if radiators are "daisy chained" or "parallel" to the pipe. If each radiator has an adjustable input valve (as distinguished from a bleed valve), then temporarily removing the radiator still permits water through to other radiators in the zone/branch. Multi-dwelling houses are definitely NOT daisey chained, and they make new thermostats for individual radiators.

My hydronic system, has 4 zones (separate branches), and I think, each zone has "daisy chained" baseboard heat emitters (radiators) so if I remove one emitter, water is cut off from the others in the zone and can't return to the boiler. The pump circulator would pump water and pressurize the end cap of the removed radiator section, and I wouldn't know what would happen. So, I would turn the system OFF while the radiator is out. (Maybe my radiators are not daisey chained, but I can't see evidence of one way or another).

Don't know about your system, but you should know the possibilities before removing the radiator.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Radiator removal

Without knowing the full system configeration it is best to drian the system. Shutting off the valve on the feed side will not stop back feed on the return pipe.

Jack

perchinonlakeerie
Re: Radiator removal

@brook world

not all steam systems have a return line. there is what is refered to a one pipe reverse return in which case the steam is on top and condensate on the botton

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Radiator removal
perchinonlakeerie wrote:

@brook world

not all steam systems have a return line. there is what is refered to a one pipe reverse return in which case the steam is on top and condensate on the botton

The OP said feed and return line.

Jack

Brookworld
Re: Radiator removal
perchinonlakeerie wrote:

@brook world

not all steam systems have a return line. there is what is refered to a one pipe reverse return in which case the steam is on top and condensate on the botton

I made a statement I wasn't qualified to make . . . intutitively, a hot water (hydronic) system seem to require supply & feed. I have a closed loop 1964 water system with feed & supply which may be entirely different in operating principle than the OP's.

Growing up, I lived in a 1900 multi-dwelling apartment in the slums, and the radiators seem to be steam fed because of the whistling sounds and pressure relief values.

So basically I don't know the OP has . . . and I don't mind being corected.

Pages

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.