Home>Discussions>EXTERIORS>prevent sewer from freezing
12 posts / 0 new
Last post
BamBam60
prevent sewer from freezing

my sewer pipe runs under my garage floor and out under my driveway. when the temps. are single degits or lower for several weeks the sewer will freeze up. have to use a power washer with a self propelling tip on 100 feet of line to break through the ice. seems to freeze up in the same area. what can i do to solve this problem permantly. i have a concrete drivway. thanks

johnjh2o
Re: prevent sewer from freezing

Sewer lines don't usually freeze. The heat that is created in the city sewer lines or a septic system keep them from freezing. It can happen if there is a low spot in the line that is holding water. This can be confirmed by having the line looked at with a camera.

John

BamBam60
Re: prevent sewer from freezing

so if there is a low spot that means tearing up the driveway and fixing the pipe?

A. Spruce
Re: prevent sewer from freezing
BamBam60 wrote:

so if there is a low spot that means tearing up the driveway and fixing the pipe?

That, or living with it, or moving to a new house.

If you know exactly where the pipe is, a surgical hole can be made into the driveway over the area to be repaired, then patched. Once the work is completed. If done properly, there will not be much to see once the driveway repair is made.

dj1
Re: prevent sewer from freezing

To gain access to your sewer line to make repairs, you need to cut the concrete, not necessarily "tear it up". Much like a surgeon, who cuts through tissue to get to where he needs to be.

A good contractor will make the repair, then pour new concrete and finish it correctly, and it will look like new.

A. Spruce
Re: prevent sewer from freezing
dj1 wrote:

A good contractor will make the repair, then pour new concrete and finish it correctly, and it will look like new.

Correction, a good contractor will make the repair, pour new concrete, finish it correctly, and it will look like it's always been there. ;)

dj1
Re: prevent sewer from freezing
A. Spruce wrote:

Correction, a good contractor will make the repair, pour new concrete, finish it correctly, and it will look like it's always been there. ;)

Isn't it what cities do?
1. Repave the streets.
2. 3 months later, the water company cuts it up.
3. 4 months later the gas company cuts it up.
4. Then cable companies do as they pleased.
5. And then it looks like it always did. :rolleyes:

A. Spruce
Re: prevent sewer from freezing
dj1 wrote:

Isn't it what cities do?
1. Repave the streets.
2. 3 months later, the water company cuts it up.
3. 4 months later the gas company cuts it up.
4. Then cable companies do as they pleased.
5. And then it looks like it always did. :rolleyes:

Heck, nobody said this was going to be a government job! :eek::p:D

canuk
Re: prevent sewer from freezing
johnjh2o wrote:

Sewer lines don't usually freeze. The heat that is created in the city sewer lines or a septic system keep them from freezing. It can happen if there is a low spot in the line that is holding water. This can be confirmed by having the line looked at with a camera.

John

Even if there was standing water the line shouldn't freeze providing it's below the frost line. Water supply lines are also in the same enviroment and typically don't freeze.
I have seen sewer lines ice up because of condensation --- but that's because the line wasn't far enough below the frost line.

johnjh2o
Re: prevent sewer from freezing

Many times sewer lines are not below the frost line. Any line that goes to a septic system is not below the frost line they are in most cases less then 2' below grade. This is also true with some service lines going into city sewer systems.

John

canuk
Re: prevent sewer from freezing

Yeah , you're right about the septic systems.
Though , all the municipal sewer lines I've seen are below the frost line -- at least around these parts the sewer lines ( and water supplies ) are 8 feet deep to escape frost issues. Then and again we can see temps in the 40 below range. :D
Being that the OP 's location is in WI one would think their municipal lines would be below the frost line.

Pages

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.