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mikebcayman
Concrete beam - support column needed?
mikebcayman

Just bought a house and found that the ceiling to the 1st floor has an extra concrete support column inserted along its length (from beam to floor) which looks like it was inserted for "cosmetic reasons". I would prefer to remove it but need to know whether it is safe to do so and will not compromise the strength of the beam. The beam is supported at each end already by concrete columns and this additional column is about 3 feet from one of the end columns. The total length of the beam is about 15 ft. Do you need any further measurements to make a decision? Advice very much appreciated as I have had different answers from different builders/workmen!

ed21
Re: Concrete beam - support column needed?
ed21

I really don't understand where the extra column is.
In the basement to the beam supporting the first floor?
Without seeing it, it's hard to say. Was the beam pieced at that location? Maybe the beam exceeded the span capacity in strength or deflection and a building inspector required them to add the column. Or a mistake was easier corrected by adding a column. Probably a few more reasons it could have been placed there. It seems unlikely a concrete column was added for no reason. I would guess a mistake.

Fencepost
Re: Concrete beam - support column needed?
Fencepost

You need to involve a structural engineer who can put their eyes on the problem. No one on this forum is qualified to make that determination. Not even me.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Concrete beam - support column needed?
Mastercarpentry

I'm very experienced with concrete beams, columns, and such. But here you absolutely need an engineer who may even want the beam and end columns to be X-rayed to determine size and layout of the rebar inside if he can't find the original drawings and inspection approval. You can't guess or estimate with this kind of thing, and making repairs if you guess wrong will be a ghastly process probably involving complete replacement of any damaged part right up to re-doing the whole thing. A mistake made here could easily go into 5 figures even if nobody gets hurt, and I promise you that an engineer will be a lot cheaper than that.

Phil

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