Introduction

Extending Downspouts »
Rain gutters and downspouts provide an efficient first step in controlling roof runoff. But if the rain or melted snow channeled off the roof isn't carried far enough away from the house, it will collect against the foundation wall or footing and seep into your basement or crawl space. One surefire way to avoid such water-related problems is to connect the downspouts to a series of buried drainpipes that lead far from the house.

Installing drainage pipe is a straightforward job that any homeowner can handle. It's typically done in three phases: digging the trench, laying the pipe and backfilling with soil.

The drainage pipe used for extending downspouts is nonperforated Schedule 40 PVC pipe with 4-inches-diameter. Some jobs will also require flexible drainpipe, which is invaluable for getting around obstacles or following uneven terrain. For our installation, we used it to snake around a few large boulders we couldn't pry out.

Along with the drainage pipe, you'll need an assortment of PVC elbows, T-fittings, couplings, adapters and other specialty fittings that allow you to connect together the pipe sections. Also, purchase a 16-ounce can of PVC primer and PVC cement for gluing together all the parts.
Ask TOH users about Drainage & Gutters

Contribute to This Story Below

    Tools List

    • 16-foot tape measure
      Tape measure
    • flat blade shovel
      Shovel, used to dig trench
    • two-foot level
      Level, used to check drainpipe for proper slope
    • sledge hammer
      Small sledgehammer, used to pound in stakes
    • hand saw
      Handsaw, hacksaw or 12-inch power miter saw, used to cut the PVC pipe

    Shopping List

    1. 4-INCH-DIAMETER PVC AND ASSORTED FITTINGS

    2. 4-INCH-DIAMETER FLEXIBLE PLASTIC DRAIN PIPE

    3. PVC PRIMER AND CEMENT

    used to join together PVC pipe and fittings



    4. WOODEN STAKES AND MASON'S STRING

    5. WHITE FLOUR IN METAL CAN

    sprinkled onto ground to indicate trench location



    6. CARDBOARD SHEETS

    used to temporarily hold soil dug from trench