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Quick-and-Easy Weathersealing

Routing grooves in door bottoms and jambs isn't your cup of tea? No time left before winter winds start blowing? Consider the barbless silicone weatherstripping from Resources Conservation

weatherstripping a front door
Photo by Kindra Clineff

Routing grooves in door bottoms and jambs isn't your cup of tea? No time left before winter winds start blowing? Consider the barbless silicone weatherstripping from Resources Conservation Technologies, the mail-order source of the weatherstripping shown on these pages. The barbless version sticks to a bead of caulk — no slot needed.

Hardware stores and home centers also stock products that install with little more than a hammer and a screwdriver. Two of the better-looking and more durable options, from Maklenburg-Duncan:

1. A durable vinyl-clad foam weatherstrip attached to a piece of wood molding. Fastens easily to wood doorstops, and can be stained or painted to match the door trim. (Stay away from felt strips; they pick up dirt and moisture and don't compress enough to make an effective all-seasons seal.)

2. An unobtrusive finned sweep on an aluminum extrusion. Works best if the gap between the threshold and door bottom is even. (For uneven gaps, use a nylon-bristle sweep.) Avoid products with exposed vinyl flaps, which lose flexibility in cold weather and become brittle in sunlight.

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Quick and Easy Weatherstripping

 

Quick and Easy Weatherstripping

a vinyl-clad foam weatherstrip and a finned sweep on an aluminum extrusion

1. vinyl-clad foam weatherstrip
2. finned sweep

 
 

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