A Dream Come True

Walk through: See a Shingle style home brought back to life for the next century

Members can search every magazine digitized in it's original format.

Workshop

Transformations

A Solid Foundation

A contemporary box of a house gets remade as a Shingle-style gem. By Curtis Rist

By Design

Counter Points

Kitchen islands add work and storage space while directing traffic. By Victoria C. Rowan

Technology

The ABCs of DVDs

Digital videodisc players are giving media rooms a sharper image.By Chris O'Malley

Finances [EYEBROW {Warranty and Peace?}] [P {Major-appliance}] insurance: A chunk of cash can ease your mind. By Mark Stein
Enhancements

Window Seats on the World

The best nook in the house combines comfort, storage and great views.By Hope Reeves

Owner's Manual

Point, Click, Renovate

From chimneys to chintz, the Web is your source for home improvement. By MacKenzie Brown

Materials

Bionic Beams

Engineered lumber is strong, stable and growing in popularity. By Jeanne Huber

Furnishings

Sleeping Beauties

From pencil posts to sleigh beds, today's smart sacks are rooted in the past. By Julia Claiborne Johnson

Upkeep

Rust Busters

Keep your hot water heater humming with these simple maintenance tips. By Johnathan Gourlay

Features

Wall to Wall

This Old House's fall TV project gets a dose of the tried-and-true with plaster-coated walls, cast iron piping, and a retaining wall made of metamorphic quartzite—the hardest building material around.By Michael McWilliams

Plus: For their technologically titanic house, Dick and Sandy Silva build a soothing study.By Chris O'Malley

A Dream Come True

After 14 months of construction, This Old House magazine's Dream House in Wilton, Connecticut, is finished. Take a tour of the rambling Shingle-style, from master-suite tower to octagonal breakfast room.By Curtis Rist

For Starters

Saving up for a big renovation, a couple gives their Arts-and-Crafts cottage a dramatic face-lift. By Jill Kirchner

Poster: Rich and Thin

Veneers—vertical slices of wood a fraction of an inch thick—are a smart, resourceful way to endow cabinetry, furniture, and other prosaic surfaces with the delicate beauty and natural depth of exotic trees. By David Sloan

Departments

Outtakes:

Building a loft-bed for a daughter's college dorm.

House Calls:

Island delights: sprucing up a litchen by the sea.

Ask The Expert:

Victorian values, tile tales, and a case of insulation frustration.

Details:

No longer passé, patterned wallpaper is on a roll.

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