Home>Discussions>INSULATION & HVAC>Would you use Icynene or Blown in Blanket?
8 posts / 0 new
Last post
Aclisto
Would you use Icynene or Blown in Blanket?

My husband and I have completely gutted our first home, a 1920's craftsman on the NorthWest Missouri Plains. It is very windy on the Plains and we have some very cold winters. We are having a rough time deciding between Icynene and Blown in Blanket. The cost if the Blown in Blanket is going to be about $1000-$1500 less than the Icynene. We're getting mixed reviews on both. What would you choose and why?

BillClements53
Re: Would you use Icynene or Blown in Blanket?

I would recommend using AirTight Foam Insulation instead of either of the 2 options you listed. Their website is:
http://www.airtightpa.com/

Tom Silva has discussed it on "Ask This Old House" before and Mike Holmes on "Holmes On Homes" almost aways uses it as well as recommends using it in his book. It will initially cost a little more than the Icynene but will pay for itself in the long run. I has a higher R-value per inch than icynene, is a rigid (closed cell) foam verses soft (open cell) foam like Icynene, and you do not need a vapor barrier with it. If used in the attach, it actually significantly increased the hurricane uplift resistance on you roof and your attic becomes a semi-conditioned space. Look at the website and decide. Good luck. Bill

HowardH
Re: Would you use Icynene or Blown in Blanket?

I recently had spray foam installed and have significantly reduced my utility bills (33% improvement). I used a combination of open and closed cell. The closed cell is the best and it performs extremely well. It will pay for itself in about 3 years.

canuk
Re: Would you use Icynene or Blown in Blanket?
BillClements53 wrote:

I would recommend using AirTight Foam Insulation instead of either of the 2 options you listed. Their website is:
http://www.airtightpa.com/

Tom Silva has discussed it on "Ask This Old House" before and Mike Holmes on "Holmes On Homes" almost aways uses it as well as recommends using it in his book. It will initially cost a little more than the Icynene but will pay for itself in the long run. I has a higher R-value per inch than icynene, is a rigid (closed cell) foam verses soft (open cell) foam like Icynene, and you do not need a vapor barrier with it. If used in the attach, it actually significantly increased the hurricane uplift resistance on you roof and your attic becomes a semi-conditioned space. Look at the website and decide. Good luck. Bill

I'm not sure which type Tom Silva discussed --- but --- Mike Holmes uses " Walltite " manufactured by BASF ....... http://www.basf-pfe.com/index.php?location=CPR&section=walltite

This closed cell foam along with others work well as an air barrier and don't require a vapour barrier

Open cell can work fine as an air barrier and doesn't need an additional vapour barrier depending where you live.

Aclisto
Re: Would you use Icynene or Blown in Blanket?

Are there any concerns with spray foam? Like leaks in pipes or problems with electricity and having to rip it back out? Long term effects?

RJordan
Re: Would you use Icynene or Blown in Blanket?
Aclisto wrote:

It is very windy on the Plains and we have some very cold winters. We are having a rough time deciding between Icynene and Blown in Blanket. The cost if the Blown in Blanket is going to be about $1000-$1500 less than the Icynene.

The HUGE problem with fiberglass is air infiltration. Foam stops air movement. Open cell foams, such as Icynene, are vapor permeable. 2 inches of closed cell foam is considered a vapor retarder. With the possibility of rain being driven into your old walls, I think closed cell foam is the better choice. It will stiffen your old building up considerably. It also gives more insulation per inch and you probably have 2 X 4 walls. There are a lot of good closed cell foams I like the foam made by Lapolla and BaySystems.

There shouldn't be any pipes in an outside wall. Wires are more of a challenge. But I don't understand why anyone would forgo good insulation because they might someday need to run a wire in a wall.

Timothy Miller
Re: Would you use Icynene or Blown in Blanket?

Howdy blown in cellulose is a great choice as it does not allow air infiltration ( biggest draw back to fiberglass in my opinion) it costs far less then foam. Is fire resistant.

RJordan
Re: Would you use Icynene or Blown in Blanket?

Cellulose only stops air infiltration if it is dense packed, which few cellulose contractors do because it takes way more time and uses more material. If not dense packed it will be fluff, settle and not styop air infiltration.

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.