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Joseph
Wood Stairway

In process of laying hardwood floor in 2nd floor hallway and will continue down stairway. The stairway is currently carpeted which has been removed. Must I remove the current MDF treads and risers(because of built-in bullnose) and re-do with plywood or can I pack out and square off with new plywood on top of current treads and risers? If I must remove the current MDF what is the best way since it is now nailed and glued and seems like it would be very difficult. Thanks

Re: Wood Stairway

Hello, YES the proper way is to remove all existing treads, pry bar, cats paw needed unless you can gain access under the stairway to bang up on treads. This is a very time consuming process and there is no real fast way of doing so. Remove treads, install new oak ones to match.If you build on top of existing you then change the dimensions of the rise of treads which now become a hazard. Its not difficult to do, its just labor intense and time consuming. Hope this helps. ;)GregC

Gizmo
Re: Wood Stairway
GregC wrote:

Hello, YES the proper way is to remove all existing treads, pry bar, cats paw needed unless you can gain access under the stairway to bang up on treads. This is a very time consuming process and there is no real fast way of doing so. Remove treads, install new oak ones to match.If you build on top of existing you then change the dimensions of the rise of treads which now become a hazard. Its not difficult to do, its just labor intense and time consuming. Hope this helps. ;)GregC

GregC, unless your seing something Im not, why cant he add the flooring on top of the existing treads. The way I see it, is if he's adding the same thickness on the 2nd floor,down the existing treads,on the lower level floor the riser hgts will still be the same height as the existing ones at the end of the day. It sure would save him alot of work.
Am I looking at this wrong?

Gizmo
Re: Wood Stairway

By the way GregC, Your quick belt systems pretty sweet.,

Good Luck with it.

A. Spruce
Re: Wood Stairway
Gizmo wrote:

The way I see it, is if he's adding the same thickness on the 2nd floor,down the existing treads,on the lower level floor the riser hgts will still be the same height as the existing ones at the end of the day. It sure would save him alot of work.
Am I looking at this wrong?

That's how I saw it too, however the question remaining is how to deal with the currently bullnosed threads when overlaying with the hard wood.

Gizmo
Re: Wood Stairway
A. Spruce wrote:

That's how I saw it too, however the question remaining is how to deal with the currently bullnosed threads when overlaying with the hard wood.

Well my last post went to the moderator again.....

Ok here go again.
Spruce I knew you would be the one to ask that question..lol

Depending on what kind of flooring it is will determine how to make it work. Is the flooring the thin engineered or full 3/4 thick. They make bullnose for both types for stairs.
The moderator has the links I sent for a bunch of different kinds of nosing.....

The only thing that may come into play is head room due to paddding the riser out to the nose then adding a new engineered bullnose.....Hopefully it will be ok

A. Spruce
Re: Wood Stairway
Gizmo wrote:

Spruce I knew you would be the one to ask that question..lol

Always the trouble maker, aren't I? :p;)

Gizmo wrote:

Depending on what kind of flooring it is will determine how to make it work. Is the flooring the thin engineered or full 3/4 thick. They make bullnose for both types for stairs.

One would assume that the existing tread nose would need removal so that new tread/nose is fully supported.

Gizmo
Re: Wood Stairway

No the existing tread nosing could stay, Just build out the riser with what evers needed then attach the new nosing into the flooring. First we need to know what kind of flooring it is and if he want a nosing on the new ones

basswood
Re: Wood Stairway

Hi,

IMO, using flooring for stair treads is not the best idea. It can create both practical and code issues. Solid, full-size treads work best and are less work.

Remember if you add 3/4" to all the treads, you have to also add 3/4" to the landing at the bottom or the first rise is taller than all the rest by 3/4"... the code max riser variation is 3/8"

http://www.stairways.org/pdf/2006%20Stair%20IRC%20SCREEN.pdf

Also you have to cut all the original nosings off, since max nosing thickness is 1-1/4", etc.

Plenty of considerations. Stair cases are not a good place to get it wrong... falls can be a killer.

All the best,

Basswood

http://basswoodcarpentry.com/

Re: Wood Stairway

Hello All, Thanks for the complements. As I mentioned earlier, it can be done several ways. Is it always the correct way? Time and labor is a "pay me now or pay me later" thing. Doing it correctly by tearing it apart will in the long run save more time and less aggravation. Just my opinion. I am currently remodeling a 80 year old farm house. Owner was trying to do as least as possible, but considering all the years, add-ons etc best to start from scratch! Gut it all, then the NEW work goes so much faster. Thanks guys, don't get mad at me...only my opinion after doing this for over 3 decades I have learned the hard way several times over. ;)GregC

Gizmo
Re: Wood Stairway
basswood wrote:

Hi,

IMO, using flooring for stair treads is not the best idea. It can create both practical and code issues. Solid, full-size treads work best and are less work.

Remember if you add 3/4" to all the treads, you have to also add 3/4" to the landing at the bottom or the first rise is taller than all the rest by 3/4"... the code max riser variation is 3/8"

http://www.stairways.org/pdf/2006%20Stair%20IRC%20SCREEN.pdf

Also you have to cut all the original nosings off, since max nosing thickness is 1-1/4", etc.

Plenty of considerations. Stair cases are not a good place to get it wrong... falls can be a killer.

All the best,

Basswood

http://basswoodcarpentry.com/

Bass, if he's adding flooring on the 2nd floor,treads,and first floor the riser hgt is still going to be the same hgt as it is before he starts. Look at it this way, if he was going to use 3/4 flooring and the hgt from floor to floor was 100" before he added it. He would still have 100" in finished hgt after he added the flooring on the 2nd floor and 1st floor.
He can add the same flooring on top of all the existing treads and still have the same rise as he did before he started.
The treads will be solid, Ive seen it done many times over the yrs.
How do we know the stairs arent a pre-made common set of box stairs whipped up in some factory. The stringer may be routed out for the treads and risers with wedges pinned in. It could be a bigger night mare if he's a diyer novice. He would need to start from scratch. Im sure just adding the flooring on the treads and building out the riser towards the nosing will be less of a head-ache for him.

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