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jsusan
Wood Paneling (Possible) Dilema
jsusan

Having discovered some dark staining on the baseboards of the downstairs guestroom, I am now in the process of hiring someone to do mold remediation. I have been told that once the baseboards are removed, there might be mold on the light-colored wood paneling which makes up the walls of the room. If so, the paneling will then have to be cut a minimum of 18". (The last expert suggested 46 in.) For all the paneling to be removed, it would mean also tearing the framing of the drop ceiling, removing ceiling tiles etc. In other words it would be a very extensive and expensive project. Not an option! So I am looking for ideas as to how to fix the aesthetic appearance of the walls if it comes to cutting the paneling. Paneling would be hanging from the top and what would I put on the bottom?

I am thinking of painting the paneling white and adding drywall to the bottom in a matching white color and then bringing the two together with crown molding. This seems to be the opposite of pictures I have seen where people put white wainscoting under a drywall.

Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions for what may be the next step after the mold has been remediated if in fact the paneling must be cut? Hopefully the paneling can stay as is. It is actually, in my opinion, simple and pretty. If it has to be cut, I will have to pray and make decisions. Thank you so much for your expertise and creativity.

Mastercarpentry
Re: Wood Paneling (Possible) Dilema
Mastercarpentry

I'd consider wainscoting though that is usually run between 30" and 36" off the floor, so it will work if you can keep the cut that low. Under the separation molding you can use sheetrock (smooth, cheap, and paintable) or perhaps beadboard painted or stained to complement the paneling above.

Painted paneling looks, well, cheap and trashy like an old house trailer. If it suits you then fine but for little more cost the entire wall can be sheetrocked giving you a much nicer surface.

What concerns me most here is what have you done to ensure the mold will not return? You need to solve that first or whatever you do may need to be done again- and again and again :eek: It's not enough to R&R moldy materials; you must remove the cause of the mold in the process too.

Phil

jsusan
Re: Wood Paneling (Possible) Dilema
jsusan

Thank you for your advice and suggestions.

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