22 posts / 0 new
Last post
swadedvm
Re: Wiring receptacle

As a safety note would it hurt have #6 instead of #8 well other than wallet

Ernie_Fergler
Re: Wiring receptacle

Too bad you took offense, but the lack of info is frightening to posters on the board. And as we can't see your garage from where we all live, one wonders how to help when presented with so few facts. Glad to see you did post much needed info and answers were provided. Good luck with your project.
But I stand by my first post and hope you hire this one out to a pro.

swadedvm
Re: Wiring receptacle

I truly aplaude caution and concern because no one wants anyone to blow something up or worse yet lose a life due stupidity. I guess it was the way that everything was said that was nerve racking..it was like I was being talked about versus to. and insted of comments questions are better.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Wiring receptacle

The ampacity of #8 copper is 72 amps. NEC restrictions have a rather large safety factor built in. You specified a Nema 6-50R which is a 50 amp receptacle, following NEC code you can not go above 50 amp for breaker. Using #6 wire will work but will afford you no benefit. Length of run and load do have to be considered but generally only after about 100 feet.
Jack

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Wiring receptacle

Engineering chart used for chassis wiring for #8 copper 72 Amps. NEC rating has a built in safety margin because it allows for significantly long runs, improper installation, etc.

Jack

swadedvm
Re: Wiring receptacle

I have one more question, really more of just an explanation. I have understood romex to be typically solid core wire sheathed together for running circuits. I have always been told that it should not be run in conduit because of heat build up. I found some stranded thhn in different gauges 6 and 8 with anywhere from 2 to 3 conductors plus ground sheathed together labeled romex as well. is that just name brand then or does that mean this also should not be ran through conduit.

Ernie_Fergler
Re: Wiring receptacle
swadedvm wrote:

I have one more question, really more of just an explanation. I have understood romex to be typically solid core wire sheathed together for running circuits. I have always been told that it should not be run in conduit because of heat build up. I found some stranded thhn in different gauges 6 and 8 with anywhere from 2 to 3 conductors plus ground sheathed together labeled romex as well. is that just name brand then or does that mean this also should not be ran through conduit.

Romex can be solid or stranded copper, it depends on the {size} AWG being used for the purpose intended. Say you have 12/2 the most common size in residential use, it would be solid. Now say you have 6/3 that would be used in a typical wired 50 amp circuit {for a larger range unit}, it would be stranded. But both would be considered Romex. The name was a brand name that morfed into a generic tern for house wiring.
Can you run Romex in conduit, yes.
DO I run Romex in conduit, 99% of the time no.
Mainly because stranded single cable THHN or THHW, when priced per foot would be much more economical that Romex of the same gauge.
Does local code require EMT for the run, if not you may be able to run Romex that you do have.

swadedvm
Re: Wiring receptacle

I appreciate your response but am not sure I asked it right. The wire packaging says romex but also thhn. So how do I determine which it is. Or would you pull the sheathing off since most romex, from what I understand, is thhn inside and use it as thhn since around here it is hard to find plain stranded thhn of that gauge here

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Wiring receptacle

THHN (Thermoplastic High Heat-resistant Nylon-coated) refers to the colored plastic coating on the individual wires. Romex is a cable or bundle of wires and usually consists of a bare ground wire and 2 or more THHN coated wires. You can also buy rolls of individual THHN coated wires. They are usually used if conduit is used because it is cheaper than Romex.

Larger wires are usually stranded because stranded is more flexible than solid wires the same size.

Personally I prefer using UF cable in a garage.
Jack

JLMCDANIEL
Re: Wiring receptacle
deadshort wrote:

Why in the name of gods green earth would you use UF cable in an above ground and dry structure?

It just seems to hold up better in the sunlight exposed environment than Romex. The sheathing is heaver and less likely to be damaged to the point of exposed wires.

Jack

Pages

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.