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JLMCDANIEL
Re: wire size
brrichter wrote:

One can assume any numbers one wants to reach a desired result. Automatically assuming an 8% voltage drop right off the bat makes no sense to me.

While your argument is not relevant to the OP, NEC requires circuits to be rated at 125% of the continuous load which means a 15 amp circuit should only be used for continuous loads of 12 amps. 12 amps at 120 volts is 1440 watts. In most cases this allows for the momentary start current.

As far as the OP is concerned installing a 20 amp breaker on a 15 amp circuit is a violation of NEC code, and if a fire should occur the insurance company could refuse to pay for damages.

Jack

A. Spruce
Re: wire size
JLMCDANIEL wrote:

While your argument is not relevant to the OP, NEC requires circuits to be rated at 125% of the continuous load which means a 15 amp circuit should only be used for continuous loads of 12 amps. 12 amps at 120 volts is 1440 watts. In most cases this allows for the momentary start current.

Jack

No, that can't possibly be right, brrichter is the only one with a right answer. *eye roll*

Brad
Re: wire size

Q

JLMCDANIEL wrote:

While your argument is not relevant to the OP, NEC requires circuits to be rated at 125% of the continuous load which means a 15 amp circuit should only be used for continuous loads of 12 amps. 12 amps at 120 volts is 1440 watts. In most cases this allows for the momentary start current.

As far as the OP is concerned installing a 20 amp breaker on a 15 amp circuit is a violation of NEC code, and if a fire should occur the insurance company could refuse to pay for damages.

Jack

So, just to be clear, you contend that a 15 amp circuit may not be loaded to 15 amps for any amount of time under 3 hours, which is the definition of a continuos load. Is this your position?

JLMCDANIEL
Re: wire size
brrichter wrote:

Q

So, just to be clear, you contend that a 15 amp circuit may not be loaded to 15 amps for any amount of time under 3 hours, which is the definition of a continuos load. Is this your position?

Obviously you have a problem understanding English, I clearly stated "continuous load" no mention was made of momentary loads.

But again your argument has nothing to do with the question ask by the OP.

Jack

keith3267
Re: wire size
brrichter wrote:

One can assume any numbers one wants to reach a desired result. Automatically assuming an 8% voltage drop right off the bat makes no sense to me.

That is an industry accepted value that is used by engineers for design purposes. Actual values vary, but for designing circuits and appliances, that is the accepted value.

glinka
Re: wire size

The treadmill equires 20 amp breaker according to the manual. Does the wire feeding outlet to breaker need to be replaced if it is not constantly used by the treadmill?

keith3267
Re: wire size

At this point, you need to measure the gauge of the wire at the outlet. If you don't have the means to measure it, then you need to hire an electrician. It is quite possible that the wire size can handle 20 amps, but without measuring it, you can't know.

I once had a house that was wired with 10 ga copper wire throughout, even on the 15 amp circuits. Not sure why someone would do that. Bit overkill.

If you feel confident enough to turn off the power to the outlet, pull the outlet out and the wire is stabbed in the back, it is definately not a 20 amp circuit.

JLMCDANIEL
Re: wire size

In the original post you stated that you have 14-2 on a 15 amp breaker. That need to remain on a 15 amp breaker. If the tread mill need a 20 amp circuit you would need to run a new 12 gauge wire on a 20 amp breaker, do not assume that the one outlet is the only item on the circuit rated at 15 amps.

Jack

ed21
Re: wire size

Jim's absolutely right. 14 ga. wire, 15 amp breaker. Years ago when designing health clubs all the equipment like treadmills, etc. generally had 20 amp dedicated circuits. They draw a lot more amps than you might think with 4 or 5 hp motors in them.

Fencepost
Re: wire size
ed21 wrote:

Jim's absolutely right. 14 ga. wire, 15 amp breaker. Years ago when designing health clubs all the equipment like treadmills, etc. generally had 20 amp dedicated circuits. They draw a lot more amps than you might think with 4 or 5 hp motors in them.

They need that much power to drag your fat @55!

You are standing on a belt. The motor must drag that belt across belt. Even though you are "pushing" as you're walking on the treadmill, the friction between the belt and the base varies, sometimes it's whatever it would be if you were just standing there, sometimes it's more (like when you're running and your foot impacts the belt), sometimes it's less. So it needs to be able to overcome the maximum friction. Think about how much force it takes to pull a rug across a vinyl floor when someone's standing on it. That's what the treadmill is doing.

If the manual for the treadmill indicates a 20A circuit is required, then that's what is required. A 20A circuit is more than just the fuse or breaker that must be 20A; it's also the wiring in the wall, all of the connections, and the receptacles and other devices on the circuit.

So to be safe, you'll need to ensure that your treadmill has a properly installed 20A circuit to power it. If you don't want to install one where the treadmill is, you'll have to move the treadmill to where there is one. If your house has been wired within the last 25 years, the bathroom, kitchen, and laundry room probably have 20A circuits available.

If you use an extension cord, it must also be rated for 20A. That means it will be at least 12 AWG size. It should be no longer than necessary; don't use a 100 foot cord when you only need 20 feet.

Making a wild guess, an electrician will probably charge $300-600 (depending on local rates and the difficulty of install) to install a dedicated 20A circuit with a single outlet for your treadmill.

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