11 posts / 0 new
Last post
A. Spruce
Re: Why tile in front of entry door?

The point of a solid surface at the front door is to help minimize carpet wear and to provide a "dirt break", where incoming dirt has a chance to stop before it is tracked through the house. Since you're putting new hard flooring throughout, it doesn't matter if you maintain a different type of entry flooring or carry the whole house to the front door.

When I installed hardwood in my house, I pulled the original tile entry and ran the wood all the way to the door. It made for a cleaner look, and ease of maintenance, having one flooring type throughout. IMHO, this type of installation looks better, but beauty is in the eye of the beholder.:cool:

dj1
Re: Why tile in front of entry door?

With laminate or hardwood, I usually run them to the door, as spruce says.

With carpet, I usually lay tiles in front of the door, for the reasons spruce mentioned and also to have a safe place to dry your shoes if they are wet, on a rainy day.

MLB Construction
Re: Why tile in front of entry door?

i agree with both of them. however, alot of poeple will have the same flooring at the front door as in the rest of the nearby area, but many people choose to install tile in the most commonly used entrance, mudroom, side door, etc.

it's really a matter of personal taste, if you only use your front door to greet guests there's no need for that added protection that tile will give you. if you live in a snowy, muddy, rainy climate you might want to consider something other than wood at your most commonly used entrance but again, it's personal taste.

ordjen
Re: Why tile in front of entry door?

If I lived in a really wet or snowy climate, I think I would be a little leery of laminate or hardwood flooring right to the front door. Nothing is more damaging to such flooring as is water.

A. Spruce
Re: Why tile in front of entry door?
ordjen wrote:

If I lived in a really wet or snowy climate, I think I would be a little leery of laminate or hardwood flooring right to the front door. Nothing is more damaging to such flooring as is water.

It's funny how your location can dictate common practices. You're right, as was MLB, that wet/snow locations should have a more durable entry surface. Dj and I are both Californicators, so we don't have such things to worry about. :D

dj1
Re: Why tile in front of entry door?
A. Spruce wrote:

It's funny how your location can dictate common practices. You're right, as was MLB, that wet/snow locations should have a more durable entry surface. Dj and I are both Californicators, so we don't have such things to worry about. :D

Spruce,

Just FYI, we had 5" of rain this winter. It does get wet around here.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: Why tile in front of entry door?

Hi,
I did stone tile at my back door, because it made more sense, it's where I enter with muddy garden boots, etc., and the pine floor finish would wear out there pretty fast. Plus, heart pine is more expensive than marble!

Casey

red2003xlt
Re: Why tile in front of entry door?

I'm in northern Florida, so snow is not an issue.
It does get rather wet and rainy in what passes for winter.

A. Spruce
Re: Why tile in front of entry door?
dj1 wrote:

Spruce,

Just FYI, we had 5" of rain this winter. It does get wet around here.

Yes, but that is nothing compared to the northern coastal states or the midwest and eastern snow. I'm sure I get more rain than you do, and I'd still run wood all the way to the door. :cool:

ordjen
Re: Why tile in front of entry door?

Portland does have over 40 inches of rain per year, but very little snow. My hardwood floors are in front of all 4 entrances. In front of each I have an oriental carpet where I slip out of my shoes before taking off across the bare floor.

Fortunately, the newer generation urethanes are far more durable than the varnishes and shellac/wax finishes of decades past. I had mine done originally with Swedish Glitza which held up for 8 years before I had to give it a refresher coat. Even then it was only really needed around the area under the table where chairs get shuffled. The rest still looked great.

Sponsored Stories

TV Listings

Find TV listings for This Old House and Ask This Old House in your area.