Home>Discussions>PLUMBING>What size Pex line to use???
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dj1
Re: What size Pex line to use???
dj1

Quote: "I'm going to jump in here because I don't see any right answers. You need two manifolds, not one."

That was not the question the PO was asking.

He only wanted to know where to put the 1"x3/4" reducer: at the meter (inside the basement) or at the manifold. We already told him at the manifold.

keith3267
Re: What size Pex line to use???
keith3267

If the OP does it right, no reducer is needed and that is the correct answer to the question asked.

Mastercarpentry
Re: What size Pex line to use???
Mastercarpentry

Thanks for the thoughts on PEX. I never worried about it's other properties since it's been very well tested and researched to death because of the inadequacies of other plastic piping systems in recent past times. With the relatively 'neutral PH' soils around here I can't see any reasons to worry about underground runs and I know that when using the thicker standard crimp rings it's good to at least 150-160 PSI since we've got that on one house where we ran PEX up to the regulator. I have seen the 'side-crimp' rings leak though, so I don't recommend using them except for repairs where access is limited (and properly run PEX doesn't need repairs unless it's physically damaged).

I'm a traditionalist too but I'm not a 'luddite' so when something newer is truly better I have no problems adapting to it. Neither well-soldered copper or PEX will disappoint and I know which one I'd rather install :cool:

Phil

Fencepost
Re: What size Pex line to use???
Fencepost
Mastercarpentry wrote:

... I know that when using the thicker standard crimp rings it's good to at least 150-160 PSI since we've got that on one house where we ran PEX up to the regulator. I have seen the 'side-crimp' rings leak though, so I don't recommend using them except for repairs where access is limited (and properly run PEX doesn't need repairs unless it's physically damaged).

There are three basic style of clamp rings typically in use with PEX:

  • Steel rings with a crimped "ear" on each side
  • Copper rings (black anodized) that are compressed onto the pipe/fitting joint
  • PEX ring that is placed on the pipe, the pipe and ring are stretched, slipped onto the fitting, and allowed to recompress (due to the "memory" effect of PEX)

My experience is with the PEX rings -- this method is patented by Uponor and marketed under the Wirsbo brand. Once attached, the pipe cannot be pulled off of the fitting.

All methods require special tools.

Mastercarpentry
Re: What size Pex line to use???
Mastercarpentry

I like the 2nd one- the round rings. Yeah, they do require special crimpers but that cost isn't too bad and they make a compact "Pocket Crimper" which handles 1/2" and 3/4" sizes in one tool. Once crimped you can't twist the connection nor pull it off. Never seen one of those connections fail.The steel 'tabbed' rings can be twisted after crimping and I've seen them leak; they require a special crimper tool too.

Never used the other one and with me not doing a whole lot of plumbing I can't justify buying one of those fancy cordless expanders like Richard Trethewey has.

Phil

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