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Pamela
What kind of paint

Any thoughts on using deck....marine....or exterior paint for kitchen cabinets? Looking at durability and ease of the inevitable touch up...wondering if any of these paints might be more rugged than the paints that are usually used. Thanks....

ordjen
Re: What kind of paint

A general exterior house paint would not be a good choice for cabinets. Such paints are blended to hold up under extremes of temperature and humidity. They are flexible and elastic, not qualities desirable in cabinet paint.

A cabinet paint should form a hard, durable surface. Interior alkyd oil trim paints fall into this group. Latex/acrylic paints do not do well on cabinetry, due to their relatively soft, gummy, sticky surface. If used on shelving or horizontal surfaces, heavy items, such as plates or canned goods, stick to them.

In recent years, hybrid water based alkyd paints have come along that combined the convenience of water clean up, low odor and good leveling, with the hardness of a true oil alkyd. Sherwin Williams, Benjamin Moore, and Behr all have versions of such paints.

Of course, oil paints are still a tried and true alternative. They generally have excellent flow out qualities that level to a nice brush stroke free surface. That slow dry time actually becomes an an asset when brushing cabinetry. It allows more flow out and leveling time.

My assumption is that you would be brushing, but of course, all can be sprayed with the proper spray equipment.

Pamela
Re: What kind of paint

Thank you very much for taking the time to explain the whys and why nots. I have used the latex acrylics in the past...results were fair. So this time I am looking for a little better wear if I can get it. The guys at Sherwin Williams told me just what you did but could not give me any reasoning behind the opinion. On the surface (no pun intended) something you walk on should be able to take kitchen abuse but now I understand why is wouldn't. Again I appreciate your help.

ed21
Re: What kind of paint

I've found the SW Duration paint to be pretty tough. I have one client of hair salons that will only use it. Not on cabinets though, only walls. What did paint guy recommend?

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: What kind of paint

Mostly exterior paints are formulated to remain flexible to withstand the wood movement w/o flaking off. They make some amazing interior enamels that came on the market within the last 10-15 years that are like nothing that came before. I mean the water/oil emulsion paints (Ben Moore _Advance_ line) and the ceramic pints like _Cabinet Coat_ by insul-x (sp?)
These paints clean up w/water, but are as tough and hard as oil enamel when cured. Cabinet coat applied properly looks like a spray job but it isn't.

Casey

Pyewacket
Re: What kind of paint
Sombreuil_mongrel wrote:

Mostly exterior paints are formulated to remain flexible to withstand the wood movement w/o flaking off. They make some amazing interior enamels that came on the market within the last 10-15 years that are like nothing that came before. I mean the water/oil emulsion paints (Ben Moore _Advance_ line) and the ceramic pints like _Cabinet Coat_ by insul-x (sp?)
These paints clean up w/water, but are as tough and hard as oil enamel when cured. Cabinet coat applied properly looks like a spray job but it isn't.

Casey

Got some advice on the "proper" way to apply Cabinet Coat?

Julie Weller
Re: What kind of paint

I just brushed on my cabinet coat. I'd suggest two coats. Sadly, I had "help" painting the doors and have a mess of drip marks and poor coverage to clean up. If you get a lot of drip marks, look into a sc****r to fix them. I'm NOT referring to a paint sc****r, oddly enough. There is a tool (such as ones made by Sandvek), that is a hard metal rectangle, ~7x3". You put a sharpened edge on it (picture a curl of about 1/64" or less) and then can push it or pull it over the drip marks. Go to a fine woodworking store to locate one and get instruction on sharpening it as well as using it. It's an incredibly useful tool and will be much, much faster than sanding.

Pyewacket
Re: What kind of paint
Julie Weller wrote:

I just brushed on my cabinet coat. I'd suggest two coats. Sadly, I had "help" painting the doors and have a mess of drip marks and poor coverage to clean up. If you get a lot of drip marks, look into a sc****r to fix them. I'm NOT referring to a paint sc****r, oddly enough. There is a tool (such as ones made by Sandvek), that is a hard metal rectangle, ~7x3". You put a sharpened edge on it (picture a curl of about 1/64" or less) and then can push it or pull it over the drip marks. Go to a fine woodworking store to locate one and get instruction on sharpening it as well as using it. It's an incredibly useful tool and will be much, much faster than sanding.

I hate the censoring software on here. I had the devil of a time figuring out what sc****r was. It's sc r a p e r. I forgot that they censor out "r a p e r" even when its in the middle of a word, LOL!

Anyway. What kind of brush did you use? I keep hearing I should use a soft brush, or a stiff brush, or a foam roller, or a chinex brush ... ad infinitum. And for each suggestion there is an opposite suggestion that says that kind of brush or roller will leave indelible marks, LOL!

Also what primer did you use? I am stripping and sanding all the doors, shelves, etc, and replacing a lot of the hardware. These are 60 year old built in shelves-with-doors as opposed to modern (crappy "manufactured wood") cabinets. The doors are probably high-quality 60 year old plywood with beveled edges. Just flat panels. Nothing fancy.

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