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Danspec4
what on exterior should be done first
Danspec4

hi i am a new home owner of a older home and i am to the point in my life where i can start to make improvements on the outside of my home my question is, what do i tackle first?

i need the following on my home. a new attached garage, windows, siding, shingles and better insulation in the exterior walls. the siding i have is old painted cedar shakes that sit on this thick fiberboard, i do not want these shakes any more. if i do the siding then id like to insulate from the outside, take everything down, insulate, plywood and housewrap.

but i worry about the windows at that point. id like to have new full framed windows..if i did this siding first would the windows be sealed correctly? the siding can come off eventually so could it be done later?

the attached garage..if it was built then i want the singles and siding to match so would it have to be all done together?

basically would everything have to happen all at the same time or can i pick and choose a certain order, i dont have enough money to do everything. i do have enough to do 1 or 2 things each season.

thoughts?

keith3267
Re: what on exterior should be done first
keith3267

Shingles? did you mean roof shingles? If you suspect a problem with the roof shingles, its a no brainer, they come first. Exterior siding and windows can be done in either order, go with the one you think you need to most. The garage would be last unless you really need a garage. If you do the garage early, you could leave the exterior siding at the house wrap stage for quite a while.

Danspec4
Re: what on exterior should be done first
Danspec4

no there isnt a problem with my shingles, no leaks, curls or broken. only problem is i see the granules coming off, while im sure its normal and i have plently left on the roof to where im not worried about it. its just if i build an attached garage i want things to match.

i also understand i can buy more and store them till a garage is built but right now i dont have the money to build a garage for a couple years if i do windows, siding, insulation and a roof first.

dj1
Re: what on exterior should be done first
dj1

If there is nothing wrong with the roof, windows, siding and insulation, you can start with the garage and you will have a solid and dry place to store extra building materials.

Generally, storing roofing shingles for future use is not the greatest idea. Shingles become more brittle, hard and less flexible over time. If you choose a popular shingle color, you can be sure that you can always get matching shingles in the future. I have never had a problem matching shingles.

Send photos.

ed21
Re: what on exterior should be done first
ed21

Granules always come off probably more so when a roof is new. If the roof is 15 years old or less it should have some useful life left if everything looks good and there are no leaks. Don't forget to check the flashing. Stick with a major manufacturer for the shingles when needed and you should be able to get the same color. Aging and variation of new shingles may not match completely, but should even out in a few years.

Mastercarpentry
Re: what on exterior should be done first
Mastercarpentry
Danspec4 wrote:

hi i am a new home owner of a older home and i am to the point in my life where i can start to make improvements on the outside of my home my question is, what do i tackle first?

i need the following on my home. a new attached garage, windows, siding, shingles and better insulation in the exterior walls. the siding i have is old painted cedar shakes that sit on this thick fiberboard, i do not want these shakes any more. if i do the siding then id like to insulate from the outside, take everything down, insulate, plywood and housewrap.

but i worry about the windows at that point. id like to have new full framed windows..if i did this siding first would the windows be sealed correctly? the siding can come off eventually so could it be done later?

the attached garage..if it was built then i want the singles and siding to match so would it have to be all done together?

basically would everything have to happen all at the same time or can i pick and choose a certain order, i dont have enough money to do everything. i do have enough to do 1 or 2 things each season.

thoughts?

If it were me, I'd partially build the attached garage, then remove the old siding and sheathing in sections taking care of everything in the walls as you go along, with the new siding going on last. That garage needs only to be sheathed, felted on top, then Tyveked for the time being so that the siding and roof shingles can be done as a whole. This approach also lets you take on one side at a time regards the wall renovations thus allowing better time and financial management of the project. Buy the shingles and siding in one lot big enough for the whole house so they all match but wait till just before need to do that with the shingles. If it takes longer than expected, re-felting the garage roof may be needed but that's pretty cheap to do. Also remember that the wall sheathing is what keeps the house from 'racking' so you'll need to either do it in sections leaving about 1/4 of it attached on the wall you're doing at all times or adding temporary bracing to carry that load while you're working on that wall. The "One wall at a time" approach keeps things more manageable and allows you to deal with the unexpected more easily. Total cost will be the same if it's DIY all the way. If you use a contractor for some of the work (plumbing and electrical upgrades) that might add slightly to the end cost but should be reasonable if you pre-arrange this approach with those contractors.

Keep in mind that it always takes longer than you think it will and that you don't want to leave things exposed longer than necessary. Also make sure this approach works with the building permit and inspection process in your area- you may need to have (and pay for) a separate inspection for each side of the house as you open and close it. There are always time limits on building permits as well so that may need to be renewed as you go. There may also be local or HOA requirements regarding how long the exterior can remain incomplete (underTyvek ofr a felted-only roof).

Planning logically is the key; you don't want to re-do just completed work and you don't want to get stuck during the process waiting for materials, a contractor, or finances to keep the job going. Also think about the weather as it may not want to cooperate. Plan on a 20% fiscal buffer and a 20% time buffer as you don't know what you will need to do in the walls until they are opened up. Have the trades or supply contacts in place for that before you start to keep delays at a minimum. It's a big job for DIY but taken in smaller chunks will make it a lot more do-able.

Phil

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