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Clarence
Re: What Did They Use?

Stay away from paint mixing with sand.
Perlite is aggregate used in light weight plaster.
Look for USG Structo- Lite plaster or **** bond Gypsolite plaster these will only require water to be added color is light Grey.
If it is over sheet rock and not more than 1/16 to 1/8 inch thickness use joint compound and add sand trowel on let it get firm to the touch and float it.
You can also use USG Diamond finish and add sand trowel & float as above.

William
Re: What Did They Use?
Clarence wrote:

If it is over sheet rock and not more than 1/16 to 1/8 inch thickness use joint compound and add sand trowel on let it get firm to the touch and float it.

So I would mix the joint compound with the paint, or apply joint compound and then paint afterwards?

If I mix it, then what ratio of joint compound to paint?

Clarence
Re: What Did They Use?

DON'T USE ANY PAINT
mixing paint with plaster / Joint compound will cause the product to FAIL.

William
Re: What Did They Use?

Don't use paint? :confused:

Could you please be more specific? Do you mean don't use paint WITH the plaster (mixed) or don't use paint period (painting over the plaster)?

If I can't use paint period then I'll need to use something else other than plaster, because the whole point of the repair is to refinish the walls finish. Thanks.

Retroloco-LJ
Re: What Did They Use?

Looks to be either a stucco finish that was directly applied over the cement or a sand mixture. The circular motion you see is from the application of the product - probably using a trowel. I wouldn't worry too much about the coloration as you can paint over sand/cement and stucco finish is available in several colors these days. Try to do a color match, a company called STO offers different grit finishes and decorative options. You could also try chipping off a good size portion (usually comes apart attached to the fiber mesh that's hopefully installed behind it) so you can have them match it at your local home improvement store.

Best of luck!

~Retroloco-LJ

JBM0521
Re: What Did They Use?
MyMilan wrote:

I've never seen Stucco before but I have heard about it. I always thought that Stucco was applied over a wire mesh around 1/2 inch thick. This (whatever I have) is applied over regular drywall and is only the thickness of regular paint. Is it still considered Stucco?

If so, then how would you repair a Stucco wall so that the finish is uniform? With a sponge?

That is stucco. It was applied with a trowel and a float finish. Back then they did not use smooth out the surface to removed the float marks. If you are ever at home depot go into trowel section and you will see different color floats with handles. They use the course green float. Today's application consist of opening surface up with green and knocking down with white. Hope this helps you

JBM0521
Re: What Did They Use?
MyMilan wrote:

I can find a rubber sponge grout float at local Home Depot, but not a "green" sponge float. Is there something special about the green sponge ones that I need?

I was thinking of diluting some sheet rock mud with water and mixing it with the paint, and then applying in one quarter circular motions. I'm not doing the whole wall, just in spots where the wall was repaired. I agree it was not painted on. They used some sort of trowel or groat float.

I posted earlier about green float. You have to look by the drywall tools/ concrete area to find it.

William
Re: What Did They Use?
JBM0521 wrote:

If you are ever at home depot go into trowel section and you will see different color floats with handles. They use the course green float.

Yep, always there. I'll go there tonight and get a green float. THANKS! :)

JBM0521
Re: What Did They Use?
JBM0521 wrote:

That is stucco. It was applied with a trowel and a float finish. Back then they did not use smooth out the surface to removed the float marks. If you are ever at home depot go into trowel section and you will see different color floats with handles. They use the course green float. Today's application consist of opening surface up with green and knocking down with white. Hope this helps you

Now that i have read more. If it is over drywall like you say and about 1/4 thick it is A venetian plaster. Go to sherwin williams and look at the different textures they have. Match color and your all set to apply. They will be able to show you float used to get swirl marks.

A. Spruce
Re: What Did They Use?
JBM0521 wrote:

I posted earlier about green float. You have to look by the drywall tools/ concrete area to find it.

Exactly, the float will be in the concrete section, not the tile section.

And just in case you're still questioning the paint/compound thing. You can't use paint as texture additive to plaster, it just won't work. You always texture first, then paint afterwards. There are some caveats to this, but I won't confuse you with superfluous info.

What I would do is to mix sand of a similar grit to the existing texture into your drywall compound. Add a small amount of sand, mix well, and try it. Adjust the consistency of the drywall compound with clean water, add more sand if necessary. When you're happy with the grit and consistency, load the side of the float with an even bead of your texture compound and wipe it onto the surface.

It will take you some practice to get the size of the bead of texture on the float right (probably about 3/4" ). Set the float on it's edge at a severe angle, and as you move across the area, you flatten the float to the wall. This pulls the bead of texture off the side of the trowel in a metered amount and produces a uniform thickness.

Here is a tip, stay on the smooth patched surface until you've created an acceptable texture pattern. Practice, practice, practice! If you don't like your results, scr-ape the texture off with a drywall knife and start over. That is the great thing with drywall, if you don't like what you're doing, wipe it off and start again. You will probably want to practice on a scrap, just so you don't damage the wall with too many removals of the texture. Once you're satisfied with your results, then you can feather in the new texture to the old. You will need to texture out wider than your patch, to help blend in the area.

When it comes time to paint, put at least one good coat of primer over the area before you apply your top coat, this will help to lessen the shadow you'll get between the previously painted surface and the new work.

Good luck, let us know how it goes.:cool:

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