Home>Discussions>PLUMBING>What is this clamp on the gas line for, and do I need it?
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duppie
What is this clamp on the gas line for, and do I need it?
duppie

This is the situation. The gas line splits at some point for the water heater and the gas dryer. There is a clamp attached on the gas line. There is a metal wire protruding from the clamp and that wire tied along the gas line for the gas dryer, and ends where the gas line changes into a flexible gas pipe. It does not appear to be tied to the gas line (sorta like a ground would)

Question: What does it do? Do I need it, or can I remove it?

I am trying to include a picture, but I've been unsuccessful so far. The forum gives an error message that my .jpg file is of an unknown format.
And I apologize if I posted this in the wrong subforum. If that is the case, please do let me know the correct one.

Sombreuil_mongrel
Re: What is this clamp on the gas line for, and do I need it?
Sombreuil_mongrel

Sounds like a ground wire. At some point, somebody thought it needed a ground wire attached. I would be inclined to leave as-is, unless the ground wire has already been cut.
Casey

dj1
Re: What is this clamp on the gas line for, and do I need it?
dj1

Without seeing a photo, I would guess that this is a ground wire. leave it alone.

To post a photo: load your photo on a host like photobucket and pass the link to us.

bill
Re: What is this clamp on the gas line for, and do I need it?
bill

It is a ground wire. static electricity can build up and discharge causing a fire or explosion. do not touch,

duppie
Re: What is this clamp on the gas line for, and do I need it?
duppie

Here is a picture of the clamp: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bz4w6Tnns7jIcFc3cUl2NjB2MGJTcmNDZ3NFZmpmQmd1VnlV/view?usp=sharing

I am not near the line, but if I remember correctly, the end is not actually connected to anything

MSSP
Re: What is this clamp on the gas line for, and do I need it?
MSSP

If you have CSST any where in your gas system, then a ground is required on the gas maini. Leave it as is!!

duppie
Re: What is this clamp on the gas line for, and do I need it?
duppie

Reading up on CSST, I don't think that is what it is. The flexible gas line goes to my gas dryer. I am not aware of any CSST being used anywhere else.

MSSP wrote:

If you have CSST any where in your gas system, then a ground is required on the gas maini. Leave it as is!!

Mastercarpentry
Re: What is this clamp on the gas line for, and do I need it?
Mastercarpentry

Leave it grounded- in fact, check it to be sure it's well-grounded at both ends. Even without the flex lines, grounding a gas line will not hurt anything and may divert static or a lightening strike well enough to prevent a disaster. If you do have those thin corrugated supply lines be sure that the appliance has a chassis ground wire running in parallel to it fastened to the solid pipe at the supply end so that current can bypass the supply- these are known to develop pinholes without this, a dangerous condition you may not notice till it's too late.

Phil

dj1
Re: What is this clamp on the gas line for, and do I need it?
dj1
duppie wrote:

Reading up on CSST, I don't think that is what it is. The flexible gas line goes to my gas dryer. I am not aware of any CSST being used anywhere else.

FYI,

CSST is relatively new gas pipe (yellow) and I doubt you have any in your house. You probably have all rigid gas pipes (black galvanized).

In my city, the gas company is using it to replace main gas lines to homes.

duppie
Re: What is this clamp on the gas line for, and do I need it?
duppie

I'll leave the ground along the rigid gas pipe for now.

Are you suggesting that I install another ground wire along the flexible gas supply line?
The gas dryer is hooked up to a residential grounded outlet. I tested it's function with one of those outlet testers, to make sure it was ground correctly. Wouldn't any current on the dryer itself already ground to the outlet?

Thanks, Duppie

Mastercarpentry wrote:

Leave it grounded- in fact, check it to be sure it's well-grounded at both ends. Even without the flex lines, grounding a gas line will not hurt anything and may divert static or a lightening strike well enough to prevent a disaster. If you do have those thin corrugated supply lines be sure that the appliance has a chassis ground wire running in parallel to it fastened to the solid pipe at the supply end so that current can bypass the supply- these are known to develop pinholes without this, a dangerous condition you may not notice till it's too late.

Phil

Mastercarpentry
Re: What is this clamp on the gas line for, and do I need it?
Mastercarpentry

If you've got the yellow-covered line, you're OK- ditto for copper or black pipe. If it is corrugated galvanized steel, then you need to bridge across it with a heavy ground wire or switch to another type. The corrugated lines have been known to have pinholes burned through them with lightning strikes on power lines and with spike-type power surges as the electrical current passes through them seeking the best ground, which is often the gas pipe itself. The 4th wire 'cabinet ground' on newer 240V outlets only partially compensates for that since it can be less-well grounded than miles of buried metal gas pipe. This shouldn't be news to anyone, though it's been about 3 years since I heard of it so I can't reference anything on it at the moment. I imagine google will have something on it.

All I will run anymore is flared soft copper which will handle any electrical current it will ever see under any circumstances short of a lightning strike directly on the line itself, and it might even handle that.

Phil

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