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wtridge
Wet Yard

I have a wonderful back yard with a thriving lan and trees for shade. I also have a water problem. Any time it rains, the yard has significant standing water for days after. I know that the ground has a significant clay content. I am looking for any ideas about drainage that folks might have.

Sherry
Re: Wet Yard

Since it sounds like you don’t want to regrade your yard a French drain is probably your best bet. This is a really common way of collecting water from where you don’t want it and directing it somewhere else. Are you familiar with French drains?

DCFDbigAL21
Re: Wet Yard

I recently did a job simular to this. The yard was all clay, surrounded by yards which were slightly higher in elevation, both sides and the yard that backed up to it. Large trees shaded most of the yard and water would stand for days after it rained. The front yard did have county maintained drainage right of way. After using rotory laser level and a measuring rod, we determined that the drainage area was only about 8 inches lower than the furthest area all the way to the back property line with a high area near the back side of the house. This obviously caused the back yard to transform into a lake until it dried up. What we did was trenched down about 10-12 inches from the close to the rear property line to the the low part of the front drainage area(we call this the main drainage line). Then lateraled out from this trench the same depth across from side to side aproximately every 25 feet. Next we place filter cloth 3 feet wide along the ditch on one side, placed perferrated draintile, covered with enough drainage gravel to just cover the top of the tile and then laid the filter cloth over the gravel making sure the the gavel and tile were completely encased with the filter cloth. At this point do not use the clay to fill the ditch. Water does not permeate through clay, so basically you would be sealing the drains. Place sand to fill the remaining ditch. Either get rid of the clay or if you are good at grading use the clay in between the laterals to slightly make the grade descend toward the drains. You most likely will still need to get rid of some of the clay. Then we had good dirt/soil delivered. Enough to cover the entire yard with approximately 2 inches. Seeded,strawed or you can use instant grass (sod). As long as the elevation of the yard is higher than the front drainage area and the draintile is pretty much the same this should help alot. The water is not going to flow off like a river but it should drain and dry up much faster. We also connected the roof gutter drains to the yard drains. The grass is growing good and the homeowner is able to use the yard. This yard is very close to the water level in the area.French drains,which are basically holes filled with gravel, would have filled with water and drained very slow if at all. It sounds like alot of work but it was worth it. They have gone years with out being able to use the yard..... GOOD LUCK:)

MelMcDoogle
Great!
wtridge wrote:

I have a wonderful back yard with a thriving lan and trees for shade. I also have a water problem. Any time it rains, the yard has significant standing water for days after. I know that the ground has a significant clay content. I am looking for any ideas about drainage that folks might have.

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kemp.samurai
Re: Wet Yard
DCFDbigAL21 wrote:

I recently did a job simular to this. The yard was all clay, surrounded by yards which were slightly higher in elevation, both sides and the yard that backed up to it. Large trees shaded most of the yard and water would stand for days after it rained. The front yard did have county maintained drainage right of way. After using rotory laser level and a measuring rod, we determined that the drainage area was only about 8 inches lower than the furthest area all the way to the back property line with a high area near the back side of the house. This obviously caused the back yard to transform into a lake until it dried up. What we did was trenched down about 10-12 inches from the close to the rear property line to the the low part of the front drainage area(we call this the main drainage line). Then lateraled out from this trench the same depth across from side to side aproximately every 25 feet. Next we place filter cloth 3 feet wide along the ditch on one side, placed perferrated draintile, covered with enough drainage gravel to just cover the top of the tile and then laid the filter cloth over the gravel making sure the the gavel and tile were completely encased with the filter cloth. At this point do not use the clay to fill the ditch. Water does not permeate through clay, so basically you would be sealing the drains. Place sand to fill the remaining ditch. Either get rid of the clay or if you are good at grading use the clay in between the laterals to slightly make the grade descend toward the drains. You most likely will still need to get rid of some of the clay. Then we had good dirt/soil delivered. Enough to cover the entire yard with approximately 2 inches. Seeded,strawed or you can use instant grass (sod). As long as the elevation of the yard is higher than the front drainage area and the draintile is pretty much the same this should help alot. The water is not going to flow off like a river but it should drain and dry up much faster. We also connected the roof gutter drains to the yard drains. The grass is growing good and the homeowner is able to use the yard. This yard is very close to the water level in the area.French drains,which are basically holes filled with gravel, would have filled with water and drained very slow if at all. It sounds like alot of work but it was worth it. They have gone years with out being able to use the yard..... GOOD LUCK:)

What about in a much smaller yard... say, 50ft2? What would one do then?

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