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njlou
Re: wave ventilation

I am sorry but the thread does not like me!!
I cannot load the pictures that I spoke about.

The JPG file is below max size and yet no-go.
I previously posted pictures which were deleted - so you will have to go by the description. Read the ENTIRE thread to learn.

SuperChuck
Re: wave ventilation

I assembled my fan Saturday. I used a Dehumidistat that breaks to a receptacle. Added a plug to the fan rather than wiring straight to the Dehumidistat. Went with the fantech 2190 fan because of the output size plus the low amp draw. I got both from home oasis. Really liked their prices and free shipping.

I tried, I really did, to add a picture inline here but it was too hard so I just put it in a zip file. In my case the basement already had (3) 2 inch PVC pass-throughs to the outside. I used (2) of those with a 4 inch T for the exhaust. Used 4->2 reducers and then elbows.

On the intake side, used 3 inch pipe. The 3 inch T actually supports the weight of the unit and the leg from the T helps to balance it.

It has been running since Saturday. I set the Dehumidistat on 55%. I live on a lake in South Carolina so the humidity is high.
There does seem to be a reduced dank smell so far. My basement is roughly 1800 sq ft and I just added door enclosures over the code required basement vents...6ft x 6 ft. That prompted me, along with the beginnings of mildew, to look into an exhaust fan.

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rob06
Re: wave ventilation

Thanks for the feedback..:)

blueyebear
Re: wave ventilation

Well, I've run the system now for a complete summer and can say that it is definitely helpful. I did not run my dehumidifier at all. The basement, while not by any means bone dry, is tolerable for an unfinished space. So, based on my experience, the wave-type ventilation system does help alleviate humidity in the basement, and my home-made version seems to work fine.

xxnonamexx
Re: wave ventilation

I have a raised ranch in New York suburbs. My basement is split with boiler room and a 120 gal sw tank resides in the wall sitting in boiler room side. I noticed my tools turning rusty. I now have a Frigidare dehumidifier and it works great. I was looking in this forum and very interested in the get up by using the radon fan as an exhaust fan. My question is since I do not have a radon issue how would I set mine up for humidity, tank water lol. I noticed the basement side a bit smelly but dehumidifier helps alot. Will this alternative help my situation and save on running a dehumidifier?

slimething
Re: wave ventilation

If anyone is still watching this thread.

I have a similar fan I used in the attic during winter to circulate warm air from the living room where the corn stove was to the back rooms of the house; it branched out to three rooms. It positively pressured the rooms, but the doors had large gaps at the bottom allowing the air out. It would constantly recirculate so there was no cold spots. Insulated vent hose (6 or 8") was used, then covered with standard insulation to retain more heat. I did it that way for five winters and it worked well. The fan ran 24/7 during winter months, and we could not hear it running. I don't recall where I bought it from.

In 2010 we installed geothermal, and humidity is still an issue, although the A/C takes care of much of it, but still hovers over 50%, sometimes close to 60%. I think the culprit is the crawl space, but I have not checked the humidity down there. The walls are sealed with spray foam insulation, and buttoned up tight. I put plastic (whatever was recommended) on the floors. It isn't "sealed" like professional installers, but the cost is too high going that route.

The geothermal furnace puts warm air into the crawl space in the winter (no more cold floors) and cold air in the summer. One problem we don't have anymore is spiders; not a one.

I think the radon fan idea is a good one. There is the Wave Ventilation system, but take a look at this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=INxWIx8QvUw
http://www.ezbreathe.com/products/crawlspace-conditioner-system/

Next summer I think I'll take that fan out of the attic (although it may be too large; can restrict it) and build a DIY system for the crawl space. It appears the trick is to get the right balance of air in/out. Since we don't have any combustible heating sources, negative pressure isn't an issue anyway.

Anyway, I read every post and enjoyed the discussion.

slimething
Re: wave ventilation

I should mention, although normally air would be dry in the winter because of a furnace, since the geothermal doesn't get very hot maybe 130 degF(?), and doesn't exhaust obviously, we actually get condensation on the windows when the dew point is right. It is a bit puzzling, so would like to figure it out. I've heard it is because our home is not sealed well.

Today I went dehumidifier shopping, but didn't find the unit I wanted, began thinking about the added cost buying/operating, and wondered if there were other options.

Besides this, I read some people use calcium chloride (ice melt pellets etc.).

slimething
Re: wave ventilation
xxnonamexx wrote:

I have a raised ranch in New York suburbs. My basement is split with boiler room and a 120 gal sw tank resides in the wall sitting in boiler room side. I noticed my tools turning rusty. I now have a Frigidare dehumidifier and it works great. I was looking in this forum and very interested in the get up by using the radon fan as an exhaust fan. My question is since I do not have a radon issue how would I set mine up for humidity, tank water lol. I noticed the basement side a bit smelly but dehumidifier helps alot. Will this alternative help my situation and save on running a dehumidifier?

That's what I'm wondering too. I don't see how. The main advantage seems to be to remove the odor and allergens etc.

slimething
Re: wave ventilation
slimething wrote:

I should mention, although normally air would be dry in the winter because of a furnace, since the geothermal doesn't get very hot maybe 130 degF(?), and doesn't exhaust obviously, we actually get condensation on the windows when the dew point is right. It is a bit puzzling, so would like to figure it out. I've heard it is because our home is not sealed well.

Today I went dehumidifier shopping, but didn't find the unit I wanted, began thinking about the added cost buying/operating, and wondered if there were other options.

Besides this, I read some people use calcium chloride (ice melt pellets etc.).

My first post went to the bore hole, probably because of links. Oh well.

Anyway, check out Ez Breathe. $1500 installed. ***.

dexnjan
Re: wave ventilation

I am concerned about the neg-pos pressure thing. I have a pulse furnace that takes in fresh air to feed the combustion chamber. Do I need to take precautions exhausting air from my basement? Thanks - Dexter Henschel

njlou wrote:

Hi

I am back. I cant believe it's been installed for 4 years. So long ago that my pictures are not installed anymore. I have an unfinished basement, an oil burner and a (metal hatch)entry in addition to the interior stairs.

I used a Fantech HP2190 fan. The unit is simply installed on the wall with (2) "L" brackets and hose clamps. Then I used 4"PVC pipe and couplings - see picture. Then out the modified window. The metal bars are security.
The intake tube is ON the ground. That is where it differs from a radon installation.
BTW use PVC pipe with holes in it on the floor horizontal section to act as a silencer.

The (intake air) hatch is designed with some large spaces that are overlapped by the cover and provide great ventilation. I use this to establish my flow pattern.
The fan is on the far side of the hatch and the oil burner is on a far adjacent side of the room. So in effect the oilburner is about 30 ft away from the hatch and the fan - think of a triangle - hatch-oilburner-fan.

Here is a little more than I know.

All installations are different based on the room and the flow pattern. You have to judge the open area that lets air through.
You also want a long distance to let the air flow through.

I did not use a humidistat since I thought is was like emptying the ocean. When could it ever shut off??
BTW I shut down the fan in the winter. The humidity is low and the oil burner provides more airflow/heat. Yes I use the oilburner for hot water in the summer.

Yes it is a glorified exhaust fan. The radon fan is rated for 24/7 @20 years. Since I use it only in summer it should last forever. Humidifiers are trash units, cost a ton to buy/run and need to be emptied. AND the air never gets dry since the units are always undersized AND the air is still stinky!!!

Good luck

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