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zumma
wave ventilation

I have a stale smell in my basement closet,used a dehumidifier and it worked.heard about a new product from wavehome solutions which ventilates in stead of dehumidifies. I had a sales person in my house and he said his product will remove the stale smell and will cost $1700. and will take 15 to 25 days to notice a difference,he also said I have other toxins in my house inwhich he never used an air quality meter to check. Does anyone know if it really works or has any other information . I dont see any results any where on the computor just the companys own so called results.

A. Spruce
Re: wave ventilation

Without seeing and knowing more about the product it's hard to hazard a guess. The "other toxins" he was referring to is probably the off gassing of carpets, plastics, synthetic fabrics, etc. I would seriously doubt that this product does as claimed. The only thing it will likely succeed in doing is removing the odor of $1700 from your wallet.

LStJames
Re: wave ventilation

I just joined this list because I, too, am looking for anyone with experience with the Wave Ventilation System. I agree $1700 seems steep to dry out a basement, but like zumma, my basement has a strong smell of mold that travels up to the first floor. Any ideas or suggestions are welcome. Thank you!

canuk
Re: wave ventilation

After reading the supplier's web-site I'm left with thinking this just a large fancy exhaust fan .... similar to a bathroom or kitchen exhaust fan.

The part I find disturbing is they are stating this system brings in fresh air through gaps in windows and doors from the upper level in the home.

The part that is disturbing is this system is actually causing a negative pressure within the home which can be dangerous with combustion equipment .... boilers , furnaces , water heaters ... that are commonly found in the home's basement.

In my opinion you would be better off with a HRV/ERV or an air to air exchanger .... at least these maintain controlled ventilation with minimal negative pressures ( if at all ).

chener
Re: wave ventilation

Looks like nothing more than a glorified exhaust fan.

http://www.humidexhome.com/jump/technology.cfm

njlou
Re: wave ventilation

My neighbor and i have the same style ranch houses with an unfinished basement. He gets liquid water and has pumps etc I have none, however i have always had dampness with the associated smells etc. i have always thought of an exhaust fan but have never found anything of use. None of the normal exhaust fans are rated 24/7. I was in his basement last year and realized that there was no smell! I asked why and found that he had the older model of the wave. He had it for a few years and paid much less. My engineering background and economical nature led me to believe that there is a better solution. Then an epiphany!
A radon fan. It is rated 24/7 for a minimum of 10 years! I got a radon fan and some PVC pipe and fittings and proceeded to install it on the wall below a window. Parts were about $200. I blocked the window with wood/aluminum and cut a hole for the exhaust. The pipe must be close to the floor so i used an elbow at the floor. I also used a short length of pipe with the holes to quiet the turbulence.
It works GREAT! I used a standard 163 CFM fan vs a 180 cfm of the wave for my basement which is about 1450sqft. I found that the majority of the air comes from my "hatch" area and doesn't come from the main house. the results are amazing. I do not have a humidistat - not needed, and i probably will shut the system down over the cold months when the humidity is low anyhow. BTW the power consumption is~ 60W.

njlou
Re: wave ventilation

Some additional information: ;)
When i explained this to friends they all replied - just get a dehumidifier. This is not the way to go. When you use a dehumidifier,you get dry/stinky air. Additionally there are certain "products " that will remain ie: oil burner fumes,radon,mold spores and whatever else. Even if you take in humid air as in a rainy day, it is at least fresh.
You probably need 2 or 3 dehumidifier units for the room size. Then you have to empty the thing and it eats up power like crazy. It is in reality an inside air-conditioner. It could run maybe $50-100/month at a time when electricity is at the high summer rate. Plus it is not rated 24/7.Update: I looked up some typical dehumidifier units and based on feedback they are mostly trash units.;)

jdonajko
Re: wave ventilation

Sounds like a great alternative to a $1700 ventilation system. Couple of questions. Did you notice any appreciable increase in your cooling costs while running the ventilation fan? Also, can you post some pictures of your installation? I am thinking about doing something similar instead of running a dehumidifier. Thanks.

canuk
Re: wave ventilation
njlou wrote:

I found that the majority of the air comes from my "hatch" area and doesn't come from the main house.

Saying the air comes from the hatch area indicates this is a negative pressure condition ..... not a controlled method for make up air.

When installing something like this you have to be cautious if there are combustion devices like water heaters , boilers or furnaces located in the same space.

When you have a negative pressure there is a possibility of creating back flow for the combustion exhaust ..... allowing for carbon-monoxide buildup or the water heaters , boilers or furnaces not operating properly.

jdonajko
Re: wave ventilation

Thanks. That was actually going to be my next question - what about negative air pressure? I am going to have to do some research on that question - how to measure it, alleviate the issue, etc. Still, ventilation as opposed to dehumidifying seems a more elegant solution.

njlou
Re: wave ventilation

I do not notice any additional problems re a/c or other cooling since i use an exhaust fan in the main house at night on hot days. In my area the nights are very cool and by the time the house gets very hot it is already cool again. The drawback is that the winters are very cold.

That said getting back to the circulation question, I have a steel hatch with a screen/glass storm door behind it.In summer i use the screen and the air from the new system comes mostly from that area. I can actually see large gaps where the air can get in.

There is enough opening to accomodate the fan plus any air the oil burner needs. The $1700 system suggests that the air comes from all over the house. the way i have it set up the air circulates in the basement only.

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