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belowground
Water line re-pipe
belowground

I have a house built in the 1950s and assume that my existing water pipes are galvanized steel. I would like to re-pipe with copper. I'm new to this so I would not be able to complete this in one day. I've been thinking about how I would handle my stopping point each day because wherever I stop for the day, I would have to join the new copper and old galvanized. Is there an easier way to doing this than having to cut and thread the galvanized steel and put on a threaded to solder coupler? I don't have a pipe threader and I see they are expensive. Could I temporarily use a rubber hose and hose clamps?

Thanks,
Mark

dj1
Re: Water line re-pipe
dj1

We need more info to make suggestions, like:

1 or 2 story?
How many bathrooms?
Do you want the new pipes in the attic?
Are you working alone or with a helper?
Do you have ALL supplies on hand?

belowground
Re: Water line re-pipe
belowground

2 story house plus basement.
2 bathrooms
Plumbing does not need to go in attic. 75% of plumbing is accessible in the unfinished portion of basement.
Most likely working alone
I do not have any material yet. i'm in the planning stage

Thanks,
Mark

A. Spruce
Re: Water line re-pipe
A. Spruce

Yes, you can definitely spend way more than a day on a repipe. The least painless method will be to replace the entire system before you break into the existing lines, this will allow you to do all of your work without disturbing the system. Once you've got your new system run and air pressure tested, then break the main connection and convert to the new pipes. Once you're up and running, demolish all the old lines.

dj1
Re: Water line re-pipe
dj1

With this new information, your plan is too involved and unnecessarily difficult.

Spruce described a much more efficient method, it's the one I use - when the home is occupied - to minimize the time when the home has the water shut off.

Day 1: make sure you have every kind of fitting and all materials on hand. If you don't, a trip to the store could ruin the whole day. Not sure what you need? don't worry, plumbers sometimes are not sure too, but they carry a bunch of fittings that they always find a way, without interrupting the work.
Don't shut the water and don't cut any of the existing pipes yet. Cut and install all your new pipes to size, sand well, flux and set your fittings. Do not solder yet. Cut drywall for access where you need to. If you can't finish, don't worry, continue the next day.

Day 2. Finish all layouts. Run a pressure test, if pass, continue. Now you are ready to shut the water, cut the old pipes out and connect the new pipes to the source, to the fixtures, to the toilets, faucets, washer, water heater, fridge, etc.
Important: know what size pipes you need and place them accordingly. Installing the wrong size pipes will cause problems later.
Remove plastic parts from faucets. Solder ALL fittings, connections everywhere. Use metal shields where you don't want heat damage.
Run a pressure test, hopefully you will have no leaks!

caution: if you don't have experience in soldering, re-consider doing the soldering, because having a leak, when you work alone can cause catastrophic damage before you are able to shut the water.

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